October 23, 2016
        Hollywood Contenders: New Oscar Predictions for October                Nicole Kidman, Hugh Grant, Naomie Harris, Lily Collins get Honors at 20th Annual Hollywood Film Awards                "Manchester by the Sea" leads the Gotham Award nominations                Tom Ford, Marc Platt and Kenneth Lonergan to be Honored at 20th Annual Hollywood Film Awards                Tom Cruise is in his action hero comfort zone with "Jack Reacher: Never Go Back"                "Moonlight" could be A24's big Oscar horse this year                Ewan McGregor steps behind the camera with "American Pastoral"                Hollywood Contenders: A second crack at Golden Globe predictions for 2016                "The Accountant" seeks to help give Ben Affleck another blockbuster                85 countries will be competing for Best Foreign Language Feature nominations at the Oscars                Tom Hanks to receive Hollywood Actor Award for "Sully" @ Hollywood Film Awards                "Certain Women" showcases Laura Dern, Kristen Stewart, and Michelle Williams                Ben Affleck is perhaps Hollywood's biggest and most diverse superstar                "The Birth of a Nation" looks to survive controversy and contend for awards                "The Girl on the Train" hopes to transport Emily Blunt to the Oscar race        

Jeff Bridges eyes first official photo for Coen Brothers’ “True Grit”

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: Few films in this year’s still-developing Oscar race could go from “dark horse” to “frontrunner” in the blink of an eye. Unless that eye has a patch over it.

I’m referring to the dark patch worn by Jeff Bridges’ character in Joel and Ethan Coen’s “True Grit,” a remake of the 1969 John Wayne western that will gallop into theaters on Dec. 25. Bridges plays Marshal Cogburn (The Duke’s role in the original), a surly, drunken cowboy who helps a young girl track down her father’s murderer. Paramount released the first official image from the film in its Holiday Press Kit, and we’re sharing it with you.

We’re not completely in the dark on “Grit,” because the original exists and can be studied. It’s unlikely, though, that the Coens are conducting a shot-by-shot remake. And while they will not be taking “True Grit” to Toronto – a practice they did with their last few films – I fully expect the picture to jump cowboy-boots-first into the awards race once it finally screens. After all, Wayne won his first and only Oscar for portraying Cogburn in Henry Hathaway’s original (though most would argue it was a lifetime achievement Oscar at that point in the actor’s career).

We also know that Joel and Ethan filled out their cast with amazing talents. Matt Damon will play La Boeuf, Cogburn’s employer who insists on accompanying the vigilante party. (Glen Campbell played the character in the original.) Josh Brolin and Barry Pepper will fill in supporting parts. But I’m most interested in seeing how relative newcomer Hailee Steinfeld handles the tough role of young Mattie Ross. I also hope the Coens keep Elmer Bernstein’s original, Oscar-nominated score, as that might be the best part of to ’69 “Grit.”

More on the Coen Brothers’ “True Grit” as it develops.

Follow Hollywood News on Twitter for up-to-date news information.

Hollywood News, Hollywood Awards, Awards, Movies, News, Award News, Breaking News, Entertainment News, Movie News, Music News,

About Sean O'Connell

Sean O'Connell is a nationally recognized film critic. His reviews have been published in print ('The Washington Post,' 'USA Today') and online (AMC FilmCritic.com, MSN's Citysearch) since 1996. He's a weekly contributor to several national radio programs. He is a longstanding member of the Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA), the Online Film Critics Society (OFCS), and the Southeastern Film Critics View all articles by Sean O'Connell Association (SEFCA).

Follow us

Breaking Hollywood News   


One Comment

  • August 21, 2010 | Permalink |

    LaBeouf was not Cogburn’s employer. Mattie Ross was Cogburn’s employer….in both the novel & the original 1969 film. Perhaps a quick read of the novel (which isn’t that long) & another look at the original film will help with future reviews? And as much as I love Elmer Bernstein’s great score from the original film, I don’t anticipate the Coens doing anything which might in any way be construed to pay homage to the original film.

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.