October 28, 2016
        Ten Contenders will compete for Best Documentary Short Subject                "The Circle" and "The Lost City of Z": Which potential 2016 contenders got bumped to 2017?                Natalie Portman, Janelle Monáe, Matthew McConaughey, Bryce Dallas Howard, Edgar Ramirez, Stacy Keach at Hollywood Film Awards                Viola Davis will be campaigned in Best Supporting Actress for "Fences"                Mel Gibson to be Honored with the Hollywood Director Award at the 20th Annual Hollywood Film Awards                Michael Moore drops a surprise new film with "Michael Moore in TrumpLand"                Hollywood Contenders: New Oscar Predictions for October                Nicole Kidman, Hugh Grant, Naomie Harris, Lily Collins get Honors at 20th Annual Hollywood Film Awards                "Manchester by the Sea" leads the Gotham Award nominations                Tom Ford, Marc Platt and Kenneth Lonergan to be Honored at 20th Annual Hollywood Film Awards                Tom Cruise is in his action hero comfort zone with "Jack Reacher: Never Go Back"                "Moonlight" could be A24's big Oscar horse this year                Ewan McGregor steps behind the camera with "American Pastoral"                Hollywood Contenders: A second crack at Golden Globe predictions for 2016                "The Accountant" seeks to help give Ben Affleck another blockbuster        

Recap: the most memorable comic book-film trailers from the last 10 years

By Scott Mendelson

HollywoodNews.com: It’s hard to believe that it’s been ten years since the modern comic book movie revival kicked off with “X-Men” and (kinda-sorta) “Unbreakable.” With the lukewarm response to the trailers to “Thor” and “Green Lantern,” and the Nolan “Batman” franchise wrapping up, we may just be on the tail-end of this particular run. For the sake of my own amusement, let us take a quick trip down memory lane with the most memorable trailers in the current comic book explosion. After all, in many ways, getting that first glimpse was often more exciting than seeing the actual film. For the record, this list will only include originals; no sequels (with one exception that I’ll point out). And away we go…

“X-Men” (2000): Technically, this was the second trailer, but I’m posting it here because the first glance at X-Men was an infamously awful tease, a confused, jumbled mess of random images set to techno music. This vastly improved trailer, released relatively quickly after the first one to deal with the fan backlash, actually did the job. There is a clear sense of what the plot was, a roll-call of major characters, and a compelling third-act montage of action and incident, set to music from X-Files: Fight the Future. The first tossed-off teaser nearly killed the franchise before it even began, and this second trailer saved it. I still remember being uber-excited for this trailer, both at its overall quality and a sense of deep relief that that upcoming X-Men movie had a shot at being a winner after all.

“Spider-Man” (2002): Again, this was the second piece of marketing, but it was the first real look at the movie itself. As you likely recall, the first teaser was released over summer 2001, and it was a stand-alone sequence that had Spidey stopping bank-robbers by trapping their chopper between the Twin Towers. Post-9/11 controversy aside, this full-length trailer was a stunningly-effective sell, showcasing every major character (Peter, Mary Jane, the Green Goblin, etc) and presenting the film as a living-breathing 1960s comic book come to life. Even if the trailer gave a bit too much away (the climax and the last moments in the film), it sold itself as a kicky, colorful blast, the antithesis to the dark and gloomy world of Tim Burton’s Batman. Sony certainly has its work cut out for it whenever it decides to cut a trailer for Marc Webb’s upcoming Spider-Man reboot.

“The Hulk” (2003): I was in the minority the day after the 2003 Super Bowl. I adored this kitschy and violent little tease for Ang Lee’s Hulk. I’m not sure what people were expecting, but the tease I saw was a loud, chaotic, and insanely colorful preview that gave people exactly what you’d think they wanted: a giant green monster wrecking everything in sight. Obviously the final film was more tone poem and character-driven mood piece than action-adventure. Ironically, the very people who trashed the film itself for not being ‘fun’ were the same who ridiculed this campy little smash-a-thon.

“Batman Begins” (2005): I couldn’t find an embeddable copy of the very first teaser, which doesn’t even announce that it’s a Batman picture until the final moments. A second teaser was released in December 2004, and it was equally cryptic in its own way. The 75-second tease showed off realism over spectacle, promising a Batman epic that would feel every bit as plausible as a more conventional spiritual journey picture. The marketing campaign was a somewhat honest one, giving us character and narrative over money shots and spectacle. Heck, the film didn’t even look remotely ‘fun’ until the 2005 Super Bowl spot. It only faltered right at the end, with a misleading full trailer which positioned Rachel Dawes as a Mary Jane-like love interest and implied that Bruce’s quest was all about impressing his childhood sweetheart (it also contained a sped-up version of the eventual ‘Batman theme music’). Frankly, the somewhat uneven sell had me worried about the film’s quality, a worry that only dissipated when I actually saw the thing. Whatever faults the marketing team made when advertising the first Nolan Batman film (which resulted in a lower-than-expected opening weekend), they certainly fixed the problem three years later.

“Superman Returns” (2006): One could argue that this Bryan Singer-reboot was a sequel to the first one or two Richard Donner Superman films, but all things considered, this is indeed a first look at a would-be new Superman series. As I wrote back in July, this is a beautiful, stirring, soulful little teaser. It was the perfect piece of marketing to entice the new and old to go on yet another adventure with the Man of Steel. Using the most emotionally-powerful piece of music from the original Richard Donner picture (the ‘Krypton theme’) and sampling relevant bits of Marlon Brando’s narration from the 1978 classic, this brief and silent glimpse at the new world that Bryan Singer had created was genuinely jaw-dropping, reaffirming Clark Kent as the definitive American hero of the last 100 years. Obviously the movie didn’t live up to the tease, but that’s beside the point. This is a powerful piece of stand-alone art.

To read more from this article go to Mendelson’s Memos.

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About Scott Mendelson

Mendelson's Memos: The basics - 30 years old, married with one child, currently residing in Woodland Hills, CA. I am simply a longtime film critic and pundit of sorts, especially in the realm of box office. The main content will be film reviews, trailer reviews, essays, and box office analysis and comparison. I also syndicate myself at The Huffington Post and Open Salon. I will update as often as my schedule allows. Yes, I'm on Facebook/Twitter/LinkIn, so feel free to find me there. All comments are appreciated, just be civil and try to keep a level discourse, as I will make every effort to do the same. Read more at Mendelson's Memos:

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