October 24, 2016
        Hollywood Contenders: New Oscar Predictions for October                Nicole Kidman, Hugh Grant, Naomie Harris, Lily Collins get Honors at 20th Annual Hollywood Film Awards                "Manchester by the Sea" leads the Gotham Award nominations                Tom Ford, Marc Platt and Kenneth Lonergan to be Honored at 20th Annual Hollywood Film Awards                Tom Cruise is in his action hero comfort zone with "Jack Reacher: Never Go Back"                "Moonlight" could be A24's big Oscar horse this year                Ewan McGregor steps behind the camera with "American Pastoral"                Hollywood Contenders: A second crack at Golden Globe predictions for 2016                "The Accountant" seeks to help give Ben Affleck another blockbuster                85 countries will be competing for Best Foreign Language Feature nominations at the Oscars                Tom Hanks to receive Hollywood Actor Award for "Sully" @ Hollywood Film Awards                "Certain Women" showcases Laura Dern, Kristen Stewart, and Michelle Williams                Ben Affleck is perhaps Hollywood's biggest and most diverse superstar                "The Birth of a Nation" looks to survive controversy and contend for awards                "The Girl on the Train" hopes to transport Emily Blunt to the Oscar race        

Oscars: Why The Artist ‘deserves’ to win at this year’s Oscars

By Scott Mendelson

HollywoodNews.com: Barring a box office blow-out by War Horse or The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and/or stunningly good reviews for the still-hidden Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, it does look like this year’s Oscar race is all-but finished, with the presumptive winner being The Artist. And I can think of no more fitting choice. No, I don’t think it’s the best film of the year. I don’t even think it’s very good. The reasons I don’t like it is ironically why it makes tragic sense to anoint it as the ‘film of the year’ in 2011. It is, I’ll presume accidentally, indicative of much of what ails the entertainment industry at this very moment. It celebrates what is hurting the industry, so it makes sense that the industry would celebrate it in turn.

In a culture ever-more gripped by the need to replicate art of the past, ever consumed by nostalgia for the entertainment they used to consume in their youth, The Artist is the perfect choice. In an entertainment industry gripped by a sense of entitlement, fully believing in the idea that once you’re famous or successful that you’ve earned the right to always be famous and that renewed glory is just a mandated comeback away, The Artist is the perfect choice. In a studio system so afraid of originality at the top levels that they relentlessly remake, reboot, and rehash films and properties for no other reason than that the token recognition factor gives them a marketing edge, The Artist is the perfect choice. In a Hollywood where pundits and bloggers endlessly wonder why the stars of yesterday aren’t somehow magically every bit as famous and successful as they were in their peak years, The Artist is the perfect choice. In a time when whole films are constructed for no other purpose than to emulate a genre or a sub-genre of a bygone era with no insight or artistry of their own, The Artist is the perfect choice. In a time when everything is treated like a horse race, where The Artist became the presumptive front-runner purely by virtue of winning the first major critic’s group award, The Artist is the perfect choice.

The Artist is not a terrible film, nor is it an evil film. But it is a mediocre film with token entertainment value, but whose widespread acclaim is at least partially rooted in the very things that most seriously threaten the industry that rejoices for it. And I would argue that perhaps some of the adulation is because it celebrates this way of thinking. It celebrates the theoretical bygone era for no other reason than said era is indeed bygone, it celebrates the idea that once you’re famous you should always be famous, it celebrates the notion that no concept can or should go out of fashion when a comeback/reboot can bring it back to the forefront, and it celebrates the mere act of mimicry as something worthy of praise. In an insane time, The Artist is an appropriately insane choice.

Michel Hazanavicius accepting the “Hollywood Breakthrough Director Award” at the Hollywood Film Awards.

To read more go to Mendelson’s Memo

Visit our YouTube page to see videos of this year’s HOLLYWOOD AWARDS GALA winners!

Follow Hollywood News on Twitter for up-to-date news information.

Hollywood News, Hollywood Awards, Awards, Movies, News, Award News, Breaking News, Entertainment News, Movie News, Music News

About Scott Mendelson

Mendelson's Memos: The basics - 30 years old, married with one child, currently residing in Woodland Hills, CA. I am simply a longtime film critic and pundit of sorts, especially in the realm of box office. The main content will be film reviews, trailer reviews, essays, and box office analysis and comparison. I also syndicate myself at The Huffington Post and Open Salon. I will update as often as my schedule allows. Yes, I'm on Facebook/Twitter/LinkIn, so feel free to find me there. All comments are appreciated, just be civil and try to keep a level discourse, as I will make every effort to do the same. Read more at Mendelson's Memos:

Follow us

Breaking Hollywood News   


One Comment

  • December 22, 2011 | Permalink |

    I would argue that Scott Mendelson may have over-analyzed the movie to the point of not allowing himself to enjoy it. This is a movie about second chances, at a career, at love, at life. He clearly didn’t get that from the experience, but that’s my take. And I dare say it’s far from “mediocre” as a film. But this is what is so great about movies, in that everyone takes away a personally unique experience from what they see. Some will love it, others will hate it, it’s all subjective. I personally think it’s one of the year’s best.

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.