April 16, 2014

Tag Archives: Anne

“Amour” amazes at Toronto International Film Fest – AWARDS

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: Day One of the Toronto International Film Festival is almost in the books. Three movies down, one more to go. (And that one has Kristen Stewart in it … do you think it will draw a crowd?)
The festival officially “opens” Thursday evening with a screening of Rian Johnson’s “Looper” (which we reviewed earlier today). But here are some snapshot reactions to the rest of the films I’ve managed to see so far.
“Amour”
The Who’s lyrics resonate deeply following a screening of Michael Haneke’s “Amour” – I hope I die before I get old.
Perhaps, then, I’ll be spared the grief and heartache associated with dying – feelings and experiences that are personified with gut-wrenching precision by Haneke’s two spectacular actors, Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva, in the powerful “Amour.” She plays Anne, a doting Parisian wife and former piano teacher who’s stricken with a debilitating illness. He plays Georges, the dedicated spouse who does what he can to help his beloved endure the hardships of mortality with the same dignity she brought to life.
The unflinching “Amour” captures a loving couple’s last days with documentary-worthy realism, nailing the frustrations, struggles and small joys that often come with the caretaking of a loved one. We have yet to see anyone challenge death and win, so the ending of “Amour” is written in stone (so much so that Haneke opens his film with the revelation that Anne has died). The rest of the film allows the couple to reflect on how they lived, and to demonstrate how an illness in the family extends beyond the afflicted to affect everyone.
It’s difficult not to project your own personal experiences onto the screen while watching “Amour.” The situations presented by Haneke are far too realistic not to see ourselves (and our loved ones) as moving parts in this difficult story. During one emotional scene, as Georges fights to feed a stubborn Anne just so that she’ll live a few days longer, I started thinking of all the people I’d do that for, and the ones I hope might do it for me. That’s love.
One cannot say enough about the performances delivered by Riva and Trintignant in service of Haneke’s grim study. They’re mesmerizing in these complicated roles. Riva, particularly, embraces the fear and loathing one can feel when their mind and body begin to fail. If the awards system [...]

Kirk and Anne Douglas are our Heroes

HollywoodNews.com: Who doesn’t love Kirk Douglas? He’s the greatest. Three time Oscar nominee Kirk is a hero. He’s recovered mightily from a stroke, has written several books. At 95, he’s a role model. He and his wife Anne gave $990,000 to charities last year, worthy causes, from their Douglas Charitable Foundation. It’s all good. Now he and Anne have pledged to leave $50 million to five charities, including the Alzheimer’s Wing at the Motion Picture Home.
But where does the money come from? Good investments. The Foundation, according to its Form 990 from 2010, had over $19 million in total assets. Most of that was from stock. But yikes–the stock is typically American and not very politically correct. In a way, the Douglas Foundation has been like Robin Hood–taking from the rich and giving to the needy.
The Douglas Foundation’s largest assets, at least on December 31, 2010, were from the Big Tobacco and Big Oil. They claimed market values of $4,5 for Philip Morris, and $2 million more from Altria Group, making essentially two investments in Big Tobacco as Altria owns Philips Morris USA while the international Philip Morris is a separate entity with a robust stock price of $90 a share as Friday. The Foundation’s other largest holdings were from Chevron ($1 million) and Exxon ($2 million). There’s also about $700,000 in market value from Royal Dutch Petroleum and another $500,000 from Concoco.
These are the same companies and stocks the Foundation had in 2008 and 2009. And they’ve increased in value. So at least the Foundation is getting good investment advice.
The Foundation also paid Kirk and Anne’s son, Peter, a salary of $115,000 a year– for 17 hours’ worth of work as president. In 2008, the salary was only $50,000, so that’s a nice raise. As Matthew Broderick sings on Broadway, “Nice work if you can get it.”
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Prince William, Kate Middleton take part in pre-wedding activities

HollywoodNews.com: Prince William and Kate Middleton are finally getting the chance to not be the centers of attention as they are taking part in pre-wedding activities for his cousin, Zara Phillips.
Phillips is the daughter of Princess Anne, Prince Charles’ sister, states RadarOnline.com. Phillips will be marrying rugby player Mike Tindall on Saturday.
William and Kate attended a cocktail party held by the two in celebration of the upcoming wedding. Kate reportedly wore a fitted emerald green dress.
What do you think Kate will wear to the wedding?
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Gloria Stuart to celebrate 100th birthday by being honored by the Academy

HollywoodNews.com: The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences will honor Oscar®-nominated actress Gloria Stuart’s career in film and celebrate her 100th birthday with a program featuring film clips and an onstage conversation between Stuart and her longtime friend, film historian Leonard Maltin, on Thursday, July 22, at 7:30 p.m., at Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.
Born July 4, 1910, in Santa Monica, Stuart attended the University of California at Berkeley and began her acting career on the stage, making her movie debut in the 1932 pre-Code drama “Street of Women.” From the 1930s through the mid-’40s, her many appearances as a stunning blonde ingenue included roles in James Whale’s pioneering horror films “The Old Dark House” and “The Invisible Man.” She dabbled in musicals, appearing as Dick Powell’s love interest in “Gold Diggers of 1935” and as Queen Anne alongside The Ritz Brothers in the 1939 musical comedy version of “The Three Musketeers”; worked with director John Ford on “Air Mail” and “The Prisoner of Shark Island”; and played opposite Shirley Temple in “Poor Little Rich Girl” and “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm.”
Stuart joined the Screen Actors Guild in 1933, becoming member No. 843 and subsequently serving for several years on its national board. She is the sole surviving board member from the 1930s.
Stuart changed paths in the late 1940s to pursue a successful career in the fine arts, returning to acting in the 1970s. In 1997, at the age of 87, her memorable performance in “Titanic” as a centenarian survivor of the ship’s sinking endeared Stuart to a whole new generation of moviegoers and earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Stuart remains the oldest performer to have been nominated for an Academy Award®.
Tickets to “An Academy Centennial Celebration with Gloria Stuart” are $5 for the general public and $3 for Academy members and students with a valid ID. Tickets are available for purchase by mail, at the Academy box office (8949 Wilshire Boulevard, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
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