April 24, 2014

Tag Archives: Eli Wallach

OSCARS Honor Robert Duvall, Francis Ford Coppola at the Governor’s Awards‎

hollywoodnews.com: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented the 2010 Governors Awards in the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland in Hollywood®, CA, Saturday, November 13. Pictured here at the event (left to right): Oscar®-winning producer Albert S. Ruddy, Oscar-winning actor Robert Duvall, Honorary Award recipient Eli Wallach, Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola, Previous Oscar-nominee Talia Shire, Previous Oscar-nominee James Caan, Oscar-winning director Sofia Coppola and Two time Oscar®-winning actor Robert DeNiro.
ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is the world’s preeminent movie-related organization, with a membership of more than 6,000 of the most accomplished men and women working in cinema. In addition to the annual Academy Awards – in which the members vote to select the nominees and winners – the Academy presents a diverse year-round slate of public programs, exhibitions and events; provides financial support to a wide range of other movie-related organizations and endeavors; acts as a neutral advocate in the advancement of motion picture technology; and, through its Margaret Herrick Library and Academy Film Archive, collects, preserves, restores and provides access to movies and items related to their history. Through these and other activities the Academy serves students, historians, the entertainment industry and people everywhere who love movies.
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Photo Courtesy of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
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Awards Season Roundup: Best Actress race might be toughest to call

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: HollywoodNews.com’s Awards Season Roundup collects insights from around the Internet on films that are running in the Oscar race.
It’s kind of a slow day out there in Oscar land. Perhaps everyone passed out at “127 Hours” screenings?
Those who didn’t pass out helped power Danny Boyle’s film to impressive ticket totals in limited release.
HitFix continues to illustrate the ongoing Oscar races by shifting its focus to Best Actress.
The N.Y. Times interviews Eli Wallach, who is about to receive an honorary Oscar.
Speaking of next year’s telecast, Hugh Jackman was asked to host the upcoming Oscars, but he turned the producers down, reportedly because he’ll be busy filming “Wolverine 2.”
Across the pond, Leavesden, the studio that housed the “Harry Potter” franchise, is getting a $161 million facelift, which will include a tour.
In Los Angeles, the actors’ union and the studios reportedly have agreed to a new film and TV contract.
And finally, Roman Polanski’s “The Ghost Writer” nabbed the most European Film Awards nominations. So should it be part of our Oscar race?
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Awards Season Roundup: “Secretariat” triggers critic slap fight

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: HollywoodNews.com’s Awards Season Roundup collects insights from around the Internet on films that are running in the Oscar race.
“Secretariat,” which opens today, has sparked a debate between prominent movie critics. The other day, Andrew O’Hehir wrote on Salon that the horse biopic, which he loved, is “a work of creepy, half-hilarious master-race propaganda almost worthy of Leni Riefenstahl, and all the more effective because it presents as a family-friendly yarn about a nice lady and her horse.”
Roger Ebert disagrees, and was compelled to call O’Hehir out in print, writing, “He has nevertheless written a review of ‘Secretariat’ so bizarre I cannot allow it to pass unnoticed.” Ebert dissects O’Hehir’s review point by point, concluding with, “I have no theories about why it was written. No cautionary warnings to issue. My faith in Andrew O’Hehir remains — generally speaking. I am sure he will strive to do better. I myself have written insane reviews. It happens.”
And, of course, O’Hehir responds to the response!
Critic fights are the best. They’re even better (read: more petty) when they occur on Twitter. As for “Secretariat,” I don’t believe the film deserves the time it takes to argue about its intentions. I actually take more offense with Ebert for reviewing – and four-starring! – a movie that’s based on a book written by his close friend, Bill Mack. Ebert goes so far as to say in his review that his relationship with Mack is “not a conflict of interest in writing this review, but more of a declaration.” Wrong. It’s a conflict of interest. But that’s a debate for another day.
Elsewhere, Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling’s relationship drama “Blue Valentine” just got an NC-17 rating. Will Harvey Weinstein fight the MPAA over this one, too?
Peter Weir’s “The Way Back” has a new trailer (via In Contention).
And Danny Boyle’s “127 Hours” has a longer trailer.
A good Q-and-A with “Let Me In” director Matt Reeves.
Gregg Kilday wonders if Paramount is waiting too long to release potential Oscar contenders “True Grit” and “The Fighter.”
And Vanity Fair writes an open letter to the Academy asking for Eli Wallach – who’s already getting an honorary Oscar this year — to be nominated for “Wall Street 2.”
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Academy to honor Alex North with a screening of ‘The Misfits’

HollywoodNews.com: The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences will celebrate the career of Alex North (1910–1991), the 15-time Oscar®-nominated composer, with a centennial salute featuring a screening of “The Misfits” (1961) on Friday, September 24, at 7:30 p.m. at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. The event also will include film clips and an onstage discussion hosted by journalist and film-music historian Jon Burlingame, with Oscar-nominated composer Laurence Rosenthal, producer Steven North (Alex’s son), and North’s biographer Sanya Henderson.
Between 1951 and 1984, North received 14 Academy Award® nominations for Original Score and 1 for Song. He finally took home an Oscar statuette in 1985 when he was presented with an Honorary Award “in recognition of his brilliant artistry in the creation of memorable music for a host of distinguished motion pictures.”
North’s “brilliant artistry” included his work for “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951), which was the first major score to draw heavily from jazz influences, “Death of a Salesman” (1951) and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (1966). His ability to handle epic subject matter led to such assignments as “Viva Zapata!” (1952), “Spartacus” (1960), “Cleopatra” (1963) and “The Agony and the Ecstasy” (1965). In 1955 he wrote the now-classic music that was recorded as “Unchained Melody” for the prison movie “Unchained.”
North’s musical background was unique; born in Pennsylvania, he studied in New York, Moscow and Mexico. He composed music for the New York stage and for such dancers and choreographers as Anna Sokolow, Martha Graham and Agnes de Mille. North was one of the first composers in Hollywood to incorporate contemporary music styles in his film scores. He demonstrated a particular affinity for specifically American subjects, and his music provided the themes for the film adaptations of numerous literary classics by such writers as Tennessee Williams and William Faulkner. Highly respected by his peers, North was an active mentor to the next generation of composers, including Jerry Goldsmith.
Featuring a jazzy and dramatic score by North, John Huston’s complex film “The Misfits” was the last screen appearance for both Clark Gable and Marilyn Monroe. The film follows a sexy divorcee and three aging cowboys who make a living capturing wild horses in the Nevada desert.
The movie also stars Montgomery Clift, Thelma Ritter and Eli Wallach, one of the Academy’s 2010 Honorary Award recipients. “The Misfits” was directed by Huston and produced by Frank E. Taylor, with a screenplay by [...]

Coppola and Godard to Receive Academy’s Governors Awards

HollywoodNews.com: The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted last night to present the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award to producer-director Francis Ford Coppola and Honorary Awards to historian and preservationist Kevin Brownlow, director Jean-Luc Godard and actor Eli Wallach. All four awards will be presented at the Academy’s 2nd Annual Governors Awards dinner on Saturday, November 13, at the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center®.
“Each of these honorees has touched movie audiences worldwide and influenced the motion picture industry through their work,” said Academy President Tom Sherak. “It will be an honor to celebrate their extraordinary achievements and contributions at the Governors Awards.”
Brownlow is widely regarded as the preeminent historian of the silent film era as well as a preservationist. Among his many silent film restoration projects are Abel Gance’s 1927 epic “Napoleon,” Rex Ingram’s “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” (1921) and “The Thief of Bagdad” (1924), starring Douglas Fairbanks. Brownlow has authored, among others, The Parade’s Gone By; The War, the West, and the Wilderness; Hollywood: The Pioneers; Behind the Mask of Innocence; David Lean; and Mary Pickford Rediscovered. His documentaries include “Hollywood,” “Unknown Chaplin,” “Buster Keaton: A Hard Act to Follow,” “Harold Lloyd: The Third Genius” and “D.W. Griffith: Father of Film,” all with David Gill; Brownlow also directed “Cecil B. DeMille: American Epic” and “Garbo,” the latter with Christopher Bird.
Coppola began his film career in the early 1960s making low-budget films with 2009 Honorary Award recipient Roger Corman. By the end of the 1970s he had won five Oscars®: Best Picture (“The Godfather Part II”); Directing (“The Godfather Part II”) and Writing (“Patton,” “The Godfather,” “The Godfather Part II”). Among his numerous producing credits are “American Graffiti, “Gardens of Stone,” “Bram Stoker’s Dracula,” “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein,” “Jack” and “Tetro.” In 1969 he established American Zoetrope, an independent film studio that helped launch the careers of George Lucas and Carroll Ballard, and has since produced more than 30 films, including “The Black Stallion,” “The Outsiders,” “Lost in Translation” and “The Good Shepherd.”
A key figure in the French New Wave movement, Godard started out writing about cinema before beginning to make his own short films. His influential first feature, “Breathless” (1960), impressed audiences and filmmakers alike with its jazzy take on the American crime film. For fifty years, Godard has continued to write and direct challenging, and sometimes controversial, films [...]

Emmy Awards Honor Conan, Snub Jay AND Dave

By Roger Friedman
hollywoodnews.com: The 2010 Emmy Award nominations are out. And guess what? Conan O’Brien’s short lived version of “The Tonight Show” got several nods including Best Variety series, and writing and directing mentions. But Jay Leno–in two shows– and Dave Letterman–got pretty much zilch.
Leno’s “Jay Leno Show” and his “Tonight Show” were omitted. And Letterman’s late night show got only directing nominations. The nominees for Outstanding Variety series were for Conan, the Daily Show, the Colbert Report, Bill Maher, Saturday Night Live. The Letterman people must be incensed. One can only wonder if Dave’s private life problems seeping into the show didn’t somehow affect what happened here.
For O’Brien the nominations, and the obliteration of Leno, have to be sweet revenge. Also the Emmy telecast is on NBC this year, on August 29th. Imagine if O’Brien wins–just the thought of it is too tantalizing.
Other Emmy nominations — there are zillions of them–went to a host of deserving people including this year’s IT girl, Betty White, as well as Mary Kay Place, Bobby Morse (Mad Men), and Matthew Fox (Lost), plus two for Jon Hamm (Mad Men and 30 Rock), Peggy and Joan from Mad Men–Elizabeth Moss and Christina Hendricks, 93 year old Eli Wallach (please–he should win!) and of course a raft of nominations for 30 Rock and Glee.
For complete list of nominees go to emmys.com
To read more go to showbiz411.com