April 24, 2014

Tag Archives: Frank Capra

Shirley MacLain Receives AFI Lifetime Achievement Award

HollywoodNews.com: Last night, stage and screen legend Shirley MacLaine was lauded with the 40th annual AFI Life Achievement Award – the highest honor for a career in film. Some of Hollywood’s most revered luminaries turned out to pay tribute to one of America’s most beloved artists. The gala, entitled “TV Land Presents: AFI Life Achievement Award Honoring Shirley MacLaine,” was taped at historic Stage 15 at Sony Pictures Studios last evening and will air on TV Land on Sunday, June 24 at 9:00 p.m. ET/PT.
The evening’s festivities kicked off with MacLaine entering the gala of over 1,000 attendees to “If My Friends Could See Me Now,” a song she made famous in the 1969 screen version of “Sweet Charity.” Immediately following dinner, Warren Beatty, MacLaine’s brother, Academy Award®-winning actor and fellow AFI Life Achievement Award recipient (2008), talked about how the AFI Life Achievement Award was established in 1973 to ensure that “the great masters of film may take their deserved place in history beside leaders in other arts” and introduced the award recipients in attendance to celebrate MacLaine and the award’s 40th anniversary – Sidney Poitier (1992), Jack Nicholson (1994), Steven Spielberg (1995), Meryl Streep (2004) and Morgan Freeman (2011).
Academy Award®-winning actress Julia Roberts took the stage to speak about MacLaine’s love for playing cards and “the boys” of her life – Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and even Chicago mob boss, Sam Giancana. Fellow “Steel Magnolias” star Sally Field paid tribute to MacLaine by saying, “She is generous beyond a fault, a one of a kind original and an extraordinary actor. She’s a renowned world traveler who collects people. They are her most valued treasures. And I’m very proud to be included in her lifelong collection.” Dakota Fanning (“I Am Sam”) and Katherine Heigl (“27 Dresses”) both spoke about how MacLaine had inspired them in their own journeys in Hollywood. John Travolta introduced an inspiring video with footage from “Sweet Charity” and described MacLaine as “a woman who does it all – but always first – a dancer.” He went on to say that she “fills the world with a presence never seen before.”
Last year’s AFI Life Achievement Award recipient, Morgan Freeman, recounted MacLaine’s impressive journey that led her to where she is today, and Elizabeth McGovern, who stars on “Downton Abbey,” shared a never-before-seen clip from [...]

Spielberg, Streep and Grant top Zagat survey, which holds interesting stats on 3-D, home video

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: All lists are subjective, and most movie lists are flawed. But if there’s a constant when it comes to compilations, it’s that they always stimulate great debate.
I’m loving the results of a Zagat survey released this morning in support of a new guide titled “The World’s Best Movies.” The guide, according to a release, is based on the input of 20,773 moviegoers who voted on ZAGAT.com and selected the top actors, actresses, directors and their films.
“This new survey puts the ratings and reviews of over 20,000 avid moviegoers at your fingertips so that no matter what your age, sex or preference, there’s an easy way to find the perfect film for every occasion,” said Tim Zagat, CEO and co-founder of Zagat Survey.
So what did we learn?
The top 20 films of all time, based on overall quality, are:
The Godfather (1972)
The Godfather Part II (1974)
Casablanca (1942)
Schindler’s List (1993)
Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
Star Wars (1977)
The Wizard of Oz (1939)
Lady Eve (1941)
Singin’ in the Rain (1952)
Rear Window (1954)
It Happened One Night (1934)
Citizen Kane (1941)
Shawshank Redemption (1994)
All About Eve (1950)
The Pianist (2002)
African Queen (1951)
Third Man (1949)
Finding Nemo (2003)
Dr. Strangelove (1964)
See any surprises? I’d say naming Andrew Stanton’s “Finding Nemo” as the only animated film on that list is a bit of a surprise (and I’m deeply in love with that film, but don’t think I’d put it ahead of “Pinocchio,” “Beauty and the Beast” or even “Toy Story”). And how about Polanski’s “The Pianist?” That shocked me.
Zagat went to break it down by director, saying Frank Capra’s best film was “It Happened One Night,” John Ford’s greatest was “Grapes of Wrath,” Alfred Hitchcock’s best is “Rear Window,” Stanley Kubrick’s finest is “Dr. Strangelove,” and Steven Spielberg’s greatest is “Schindler’s List.”
Speaking of Spielberg, he was named the all-time favorite director according to the survey, while favorite actor titles went to Cary Grant and Meryl Streep. Analyzing top films by decade, Zagats came up with the following list.
1920s: The General
1930s: Wizard of Oz
1940s: Casablanca
1950s: Singin’ in the Rain
1960s: Lawrence of Arabia
1970s: The Godfather
1980s: Raiders of the Lost Ark
1990s: Schindler’s List
2000s: The Pianist
And while lists are fun for discussion, there were telling figures buried in the survey that should catch the eye of industry insiders. According to the survey, 37 percent of film fans who watch movies at home say they watch movies on a portable device such [...]

Film Independent Announces Jury Award Winners of 2010 Los Angeles Film Festival

hollywoodnews.com: Today Film Independent, the non-profit arts organization that produces the Spirit Awards and the Los Angeles Film Festival, announced its 2010 Los Angeles Film Festival award winners at a brunch at CHAYA Downtown. Audience award winners will be announced tomorrow afternoon at the Closing Night film, Despicable Me. The Los Angeles Film Festival, presented by The Los Angeles Times, with its central hub at L.A. LIVE, began Thursday, June 17 and will end on Sunday, June 27.
“There were thousands of movie fans at the festival this year, discovering new stories from our talented filmmakers,” said Film Independent Executive Director Dawn Hudson. “We are delighted to have the support of the Los Angeles film-going community for these films and their creators”
The two top juried awards of the Los Angeles Film Festival are the Narrative Award and Documentary Award, each carrying an unrestricted $50,000 cash prize, funded by Film Independent, for the winning film’s director. The awards were established by the Festival encourage independent filmmakers to pursue their artistic ambitions.
“In a year that celebrated an exhilarating spectrum of American and international cinema, it’s so fitting that these jury awards reflect the incredible diversity of the Festival,” said Festival Director Rebecca Yeldham.
The Narrative Award recognizes the finest narrative film in competition at the Festival and went to Pernille Fischer Christensen for A Family (En Familie). The Documentary Award recognizes the finest documentary film in competition at the Festival and went to J. Clay Tweel for Make Believe.
The award for Best Ensemble Performance in the Narrative Competition went to Sabrina Lloyd, James Urbaniak, Lynn Cohen, Harry Chase, Nate Smith and Kamel Boutros for their performance in Adam Reid’s Hello Lonesome. Given to an actor or actors from an official selection in the Narrative Competition, this is the seventh year the award has been given at the Festival.
The award for Best Narrative Short Film went to Pablo Larcuen’s My Invisible Friend. The award for Best Documentary Short Film went to Tomasz Wolski’s The Lucky One. Beomsik Shimbe Shim’s Wonder Hospital won the award for Best Animated Short Film.
The Narrative Feature Competition jury was comprised of director Charles Burnett, screenwriter/producer Larry Karaszewski, and LA Weekly film critic Ella Taylor. The Documentary Feature Competition jury was comprised of director/actress Karen Moncrief, director Arthur Dong, and film critic and journalist Robert Abele. The Shorts Competition jury was comprised of writer/performer Sandra Tsing Loh, actor Andrew Garfield, [...]

Jonathan Gold, Quincy Jones, and Paul Reubens are Los Angeles Film Festival’s 2010 Artists in Residence.

hollywoodnews.com: Each Artist will program a film in the Festival that has inspired his work, and then stick around for a conversation with the audience!
Jonathan Gold: A conversation about food and film.
Film Selection: Udon (2006, Japan)
Directed by Katsuyuki Motohiro
Udon is a high-spirited comic ode to the power of Japan’s ubiquitous noodle. After failing to make it as a stand-up comedian, a young man drags himself home to Kagawa Prefecture, where his father owns a small udon factory. When an article he writes for a local magazine sets off a nationwide udon craze, he learns there’s more to the simple noodle, and the people who make them, than he ever expected.
Jonathan Gold is the Pulitzer Prize-winning restaurant critic for LA Weekly and author of Counter Intelligence: Where to Eat in the Real Los Angeles.

Quincy Jones: A conversation about music and film.
Film Selection: The Color Purple (1985)
Directed by Steven Spielberg
“It is a great, warm, hard, unforgiving, triumphant movie, and there is not a scene that does not shine with the love of the people who made it,” wrote Roger Ebert of Steven Spielberg’s The Color Purple. Twenty-five years later, Spielberg’ luminous adaptation of Alice Walker’s beloved novel stands as a landmark moment in the careers of its extraordinary cast. It introduced to the big screen both Whoopi Goldberg and Oprah Winfrey, and sent Danny Glover’s career into orbit. And its wonderful score, of course, was the work of the incomparable Quincy Jones.
Quincy Jones is a legendary music composer and producer.

Paul Reubens: A conversation about classics and comedy.
Film Selection: You Can’t Take It With You (1938)
Directed by Frank Capra
You Can’t Take It With You, Frank Capra’s Best Picture-winning screwball comedy, stars James Stewart, in his first collaboration with Capra, and the incomparable Jean Arthur as two young people in love whose families could not be more different. His are well-heeled, high society types; hers are a collection of artists and eccentrics. True love—as well as harmonicas, fireworks, and back taxes—brings everyone together in one of Capra’s most manic, marvelous films.
Paul Reubens is an actor and comedian known for his work on stage, television, and screen and as the celebrated icon Pee-wee Herman.
* There will also be a special 25th anniversary family screening of Pee-wee’s Big Adventure on June 26th at the Orpheum Theatre.
PASSES ON SALE NOW. TICKETS ON SALE JUNE 1.