January 01, 2015

Tag Archives: george clooney

Joey Berlin’s Goldmine – Critics Choice Awards

Joey Berlin, who co-founded the Broadcast Film Critics Assn. in 1995 and continues to oversee its day-to-day operations and its televised Critics’ Choice Movie Awards each year, likes to say that his membership seems to be satisfied with the job he’s doing because he’s been repeatedly re-elected every two years as its president.
To read article about CRACKPOT OF THE MONTH – DAVID POLAND – BFCA
The nonprofit group’s latest tax filings show that Berlin also is handsomely paid for his work. The BFCA’s latest IRS Form 990 tax filing shows that Berlin Entertainment, Inc., a company 100 percent owned by Berlin, received $859,077 for production services in 2012, a jump from $376,270 listed on tax forms the previous year.
To read article about CRACKPOT OF THE MONTH – DAVID POLAND – BFCA

Between 2009 and 2012, Berlin Entertainment was paid a total of $1,851,347, according to federal tax documents filed by the nonprofit.
Meanwhile, Berlin’s base compensation and benefits totaled $478,350 in 2012, according to the IRS filing. That compares with $455,230 the previous year.
TO CHECK TAX RETURNS FOR BFCA
The BFCA touts itself as the largest film critics organization in the U.S. and Canada, representing more than 280 television, radio and online critics.
To read prior story about Joey Berlin’s Goldmine and Critics Choice Awards.
To read about CRACKPOT OF THE MONTH – DAVID POLAND – BFCA
The boom in Oscar media coverage has propelled nonprofits like the BFCA into prominence in the run-up to the Academy Awards. Other shows like the Golden Globe Awards, the Palm Springs International Film Festival and the Santa Barbara Film Festival actively court potential Oscar nominees and the studios and independent distributors gladly lend their help in supplying stars for their glitzy events hoping to generate Oscar buzz.
In recent years, the Critics’ Choice Awards has attracted numerous stars to its red carpet gala, including George Clooney, Sandra Bullock, Leonardo di Caprio, Brad Pitt and Meryl Streep. They mix and mingle and dine along with broadcast critics from around North America.
In 2012, the year covered by the tax returns, the Critics’ Choice Awards were held at the Hollywood Palladium and broadcast by VH1. The winners that year were “The Artist” for best picture, George Clooney for best actor in “The Descendants” and Viola Davis for best actress in “The Help.” Michel Hazanavicius won best director for “The Artist.”
This year’s Critics’ Choice Awards was broadcast live on the CW Network from […]

The 84th Academy Awards: If I had been a voter

Once again today I’m going to be taking a look back at a recent Oscar lineup and explaining what my vote would have been in each of the big eight categories we all follow so intently each season. I previously mentioned that potentially I could do this once a week with previous Academy Award ceremonies, and while I’m going to be truing to do that, time will still tell. Again, if nothing else, this gives you an interesting look into my cinematic tastes. Over the course of the year you can sort of get a feel for what my current favorites are, but now we can look to the past a bit more.
Alright, here goes nothing:
Best Picture – Moneyball
The nominees here for this ceremony were The Artist, The Descendants, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, The Help, Hugo, Midnight in Paris, Moneyball, The Tree of Life, and War Horse. Obviously The Artist took it in real life, and Drive would have been my clear pick had it been nominated, but if I had been a voter my choice would have been between The Descendants, Midnight in Paris, and Moneyball. At the time, The Descendants would have been my pick, but now I think I lean towards Moneyball, so that would wind up getting my vote for Best Picture.
Best Director – Alexander Payne for The Descendants
I’d have voted for Nicolas Winding Refn here for Drive, but unsurprisingly he wasn’t nominated. The actual nominees were Woody Allen for Midnight in Paris, Michel Hazanavicius for The Artist, Terrence Malick for The Tree of Life, Alexander Payne for The Descendants, and Martin Scorsese for Hugo. Without Refn, I don’t have anyone I’m too wild about, but I think Payne might be the best of the bunch. The aforementioned Refn is easily my personal pick overall, but Payne is my choice of the actual nominees.
Best Actor – Brad Pitt for Moneyball
In a perfect world, I’d have seen either Michael Fassbender rewarded for Shame, Ryan Gosling in the lineup for Drive, Tom Hardy cited for Warrior, or Michael Parks in for Red State and subsequently any of them would have been my vote (likely Fassbender), but such is life. The actual nominees here though were Demián Bichir for A Better Life, George Clooney for The Descendants, Jean Dujardin for The Artist, Gary Oldman for Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and Brad Pitt for Moneyball. The choice of these […]

Shailene Woodley Talks: “The Fault In Our Stars”

Shailene Woodley tells Vanity Fair senior West Coast editor Krista Smith she nearly quit acting after her supporting role in The Descendants earned her laurels from Hollywood and sudden success. “Somebody came to me and said, ‘I can’t wait to see what you do next.’ I took that as pressure, that I had to live up to somebody else’s expectations,” she recalls. “There were a few months where I was like, ‘I don’t want to act anymore.’ And then I got over it and realized it’s none of my business what other people think of me.”
The headstrong young actress adds that George Clooney, her co-star in The Descendants, has helped reaffirm her beliefs amid the distractions of Hollywood. “He has been an angel in my life for many reasons,” she tells Smith. “He knew everyone’s name on set,” she says. “He treated everyone as an equal and everyone got his warmth.”
For Clooney, the adulation is mutual. “Shailene can do whatever she wants,” the actor tells Smith. “If she wants to be a movie star, she has it. If she wants to change the world, she will. Her talent and kindness go hand in hand.”
Though Woodley has a reputation as an actress with a conscience, she tells Smith she realizes that not everyone wants to hear about it. “As much as this industry is a platform for talking about big issues, there’s also so many fucking issues. You could talk about Russia, or Argentina, or fracking, or G.M.O.’s. Maybe the only thing that I’m supposed to do is just show up and be me in every moment. Because I do feel like one of my gifts is to be open and lovely,simple things like smiling at strangers and having kind, small interactions. I think that is what’s going to ultimately shift things.”
Her refreshing sensibility has helped her deal with the disappointments that follow a career in acting, case in point, her reaction to her role as Mary Jane Watson being ultimately cut out from The Amazing Spider-Man 2. “For a few hours it was literally like, ‘Oh, my God, was I awful? Why did they cut me? What are people going to think?’ I woke up the next morning and I was like, ‘O.K., it makes total sense.’ I’m a pretty spiritual person, so I can just sit back and trust that everything happens for a reason, even if my […]

Ryan Gosling: the next actor turned director to watch out for?

HOLLYWOOD ENTERTAINMENT NETWORK: A few days ago at the Cannes Film Festival, A list actor Ryan Gosling’s directorial debut Lost River (which was originally titled by him as the more compelling How To Catch a Monster) screened to a rather divisive response from critics. Some praised his skill behind the camera and the way he worked in many influences from other filmmakers, while others panned the movie for being derivative and an imitation of better works. That more or less takes the film out of major awards contention, but it does leave me still contemplating Gosling’s future as a director. He may not have hit a home run his first time out, but very few actors turned directors do. My hunch is that he’s a few years away from making a flick that really wows folks.
Why do I think that? Look at other A-listers who stepped behind the camera. George Clooney’s debut Confessions of a Dangerous Mind wasn’t rapturously received either, but his next outing was Good Night and Good Luck, which was nominated for Best Picture and got Clooney a handful of nominations himself. For another example, look at Angelina Jolie. She made her debut with the foreign war flick In the Land of Blood and Honey, but this year she’s back with the Oscar frontrunner Unbroken. Gosling certainly wouldn’t be the first to have his sophomore feature be the one that’s really embraced. In fact, it seems to almost be the path of choice for many of his colleagues. Get a perhaps overly ambitious debut out of the way first and then go hit him with something a bit more accessible the next time out.
If you look at the filmmakers that Gosling is apparently referencing, you can see that he’s only beginning to develop his own filmmaking identity. If you mix the work of Derek Cianfrance, David Lynch, Gaspar Noe, and Nicolas Winding Refn, you’re bound to get something rather off the beaten path. Now that he’s basically thrown everything at the wall to see what stuck, he’s got the opportunity to show off his own vision next time out. If not, he can even just begin to figure out which influences to play up and which ones to sort of keep on the back burner.
Right now, Lost River is probably little more than a curiosity, but it’s the start of something. There’s no way of knowing […]

A third of the way through 2014 and there are no Oscar contenders

Well, this is a bit of a bummer. It just dawned on me how rare it is that we’re basically at the start of the summer movie season and we’ve yet to have a real Best Picture contender debut anywhere, even at a film festival. It’s now May and a third of the year has passed…usually by now either the Sundance Film Festival or the Tribeca Film Festival has been home to at least one or two likely contenders, alongside whatever early year releases catch our attention. That really hasn’t been the case this time around, likely leading to another situation where the final months of the year will be a logjam of movies hoping to crack the Oscar lineup.
The closest we’ve had to a contender is Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, which debuted at Sundance, but that’s such a hard film to figure out. I’m very high on it, and spoke glowingly of its potential just a matter of days ago, but there’s a strong possibility that Oscar voters will ignore it. That seemed to be Park City’s only major option, which is not the norm. Usually there’s a handful of titles hoping to transition from there to the Oscar race. Just last year we had Before Midnight, Fruitvale Station (then just called Fruitvale), The Spectacular Now, and Stories We Tell, to name most of the major awards hopefuls from that fest. This year, it seems to be Linklater’s flick or bust.
Tribeca had even slimmer pickings, with none of their debuts being on that level and only Jon Favreau’s Chef seeming like anything worth mentioning in passing as an awards player. I’m a huge fan of the film, but it’s very light and probably too simple of a movie to catch on with voters in any sort of a major way. That’s a shame, but it’s also the truth.
As for the wide releases, the best chances would have been George Clooney’s The Monuments Men and Darren Aronofsky’s Noah, but both of those movies were met with very mixed reviews, even if both are box office success stories. The films needed to be critical darlings, and neither came close to that, so the technical categories will really be the only places where they can make a mark. A shut out is just as likely for each though, especially considering the early release dates they were stuck with.
I will say that among the […]

Oscars®: What’s up with the 2015 Awards Race: The early contenders so far

I’m starting up with a new weekly series here at Hollywood News, one tentatively titled “What’s up with the 2015 Awards Race”. Once or twice a week, I’ll be looking at potential 2014 awards contenders, and for the inaugural piece today, I figured I’d cover some of the films that have already come out this year, including one notable release that’s beginning its theatrical run today. Future pieces will more specifically focus on one title in particular, completely with more of an in depth look at them, but today we’ll start off with a primer.
I’ve got a quartet of films to discuss, though they all have various pros and cons to their potential candidacies, obviously. Consider this a template for what’s to come during the year, including a placeholder grade of either “likely contender”, “potential contender”, or “long shot contender” for each…

The Grand Budapest Hotel
Directed by: Wes Anderson
Written by: Wes Anderson and Hugo Guinness
Cast: Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Jude Law, Harvey Keitel, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Tony Revolori, Saoirse Ronan, Léa Seydoux, Jason Schwartzman, Tilda Swinton, Tom Wilkinson, and Owen Wilson
This film just began its theatrical run today in limited release, but Wes Anderson projects always flirt with the Academy’s attention. Anderson himself has a trio of Oscar nominations to his credit so far (for co-writing Moonrise Kingdom and The Royal Tenenbaums as well as for making the animated feature Fantastic Mr. Fox), so he’s no stranger to awards. Best Picture and Best Director has so far eluded him though. If the year is on the weak side, a comedically tinged film like this one could possibly slip in, though Anderson himself is more likely for another Screenplay citation than a Director one. Watch out for Ralph Fiennes too, as he could parlay a likely Golden Globe nomination into some Academy consideration as well.
Grade: Likely contender
The LEGO Movie
Directed by: Phil Lord and Christopher Miller
Written by: Dan Hageman, Kevin Hageman, Phil Lord, and Christopher Miller
Cast: (Voices of) Chris Pratt, Will Ferrell, Elizabeth Banks, Will Arnett, Nick Offerman, Alison Brie, Charlie Day, Liam Neeson, and Morgan Freeman
I have my doubts that we’ll see another animated title get a Best Picture nomination again for a while, but the reviews and box office for this one make me think that it’s at worth considering its candidacy at this early juncture. If nothing else, this one […]

Oscars: Get to know a Best Picture nominee: “Gravity”

“Gravity”
Directed by: Alfonso Cuarón
Written by: Alfonso Cuarón and Jonás Cuarón (reportedly with some uncredited collaboration by George Clooney as well)
Main cast members: Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, and Ed Harris (voice)
Number of Oscar nominations in total: 10
Other nominations besides Best Picture: Best Director (Cuarón), Best Actress (Bullock), Best Production Design, Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing, Best Original Score, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing, and Best Visual Effects
Notable precursor wins: Tied for Best Picture at the Producers Guild of America Awards, Won Best Director at the Directors Guild of America Awards, Won Best Director at the Golden Globe Awards, Won Best Director and Best British Film at the BAFTA Awards,
Chances at winning Best Picture: One of the top three contenders for the award and a definite co-frontrunner, if not THE frontrunner
Chances at other Academy Award wins: A sure fire win in Best Director, along with Best Cinematography and Best Visual Effects, though it could legitimately win every technical award that it’s nominated for
ANALYSIS OF OTHER OSCAR NOMINEES: 12 Years a Slave, American Hustle, Captain Phillips, Dallas Buyers Club, Gravity and HER.
Gravity is the fifth film in my “get to know a Best Picture nominee” series, and it’s the other main contender in the category. In fact, it’s probably got the best chance of the bunch to win. Sure, I wouldn’t be surprised one bit if 12 Years a Slave took home Best Picture, and I’d be one of the few not surprised by an American Hustle win, but still…Gravity is the most likely of that trio. It tied with Hustle for the most nominations overall, has picked up some strong precursor attention, and will likely dominate the tech categories at the Oscar ceremony. That gives it a leg up on the competition for sure. It’ll likely come down to if voters are opposed to citing a science fiction film as their Best Picture winner. If they don’t mind, then this movie is probably winning the Oscar.
Working in Gravity’s favor is just how significant its wins have been and how rare a split between Best Picture and Best Director is. Alfonso Cuarón has dominated the Best Director race, so his win is a slam dunk. With the flick tied for the most nominations overall and a prime competitor for the top prize, it’ll be all too easy for Academy members to not split their ballot. It may not have won the […]

“Vanity Fair” 2014 Hollywood Issue. A year of spectacular film with a group of distinguished actors

For the 20th annual Vanity Fair Hollywood Issue, the magazine celebrates a year of spectacular film with a group of distinguished actors. The cover, a three-panel foldout by Vanity Fair contributing photographer Annie Leibovitz, who also shot the first ever Hollywood Issue cover, in 1995, features Oscar nominees Julia Roberts (August: Osage County), Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave), Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club), and Lupita Nyong?o (12 Years a Slave), as well as Idris Elba (Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom), George Clooney (Gravity), Michael B. Jordan (Fruitvale Station), Naomie Harris (Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom), Brie Larson (Short Term 12), Chadwick Boseman (42), Margot Robbie (The Wolf of Wall Street) and Léa Seydoux (Blue Is the Warmest Color).
Julia Roberts is an industry veteran who makes a splash with her Oscar-nominated performance in John Wells’s August: Osage County. Though Roberts has been on the cover of Vanity Fair five times, this is her first time on the Hollywood Issue cover.
British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor rivets audiences with his Oscar-nominated portrayal of Solomon Northup, in Steve McQueen?s 12 Years a Slave.
Jared Leto recently won a Golden Globe for his heartbreaking, Oscar-nominated performance as the transgender Rayon in Jean-Marc Vallée’s Dallas Buyers Club.
Recent Yale Drama School grad Lupita Nyong’o won universal acclaim this year with her Oscar-nominated performance as the beautiful, tortured Patsey in 12 Years a Slave.
British actor Idris Elba brings to life Africa’s greatest hero, in Justin Chadwick?s Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.
The perennial matinee idol George Clooney provides a soothing calm to a perilous 3-D space walk in Alfonso Cuarón?s Oscar-nominated Gravity. He was also one of the producers of August: Osage County. This is his first time appearing on the Hollywood Issue cover.
Michael B. Jordan raised the profile of Oscar Grant III, the young man fatally shot by an Oakland transit-police officer, with his performance in Ryan Coogler?s sleeper hit, Fruitvale Station.
Recent Bond Girl Naomie Harris held her own as Winnie Mandela, starring opposite fellow Brit Elba in Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.
Brie Larson breaks onto the scene with her lead role in Destin Daniel Cretton?s Short Term 12.
Chadwick Boseman moved up to the majors with his performance as baseball legend Jackie Robinson, in Brian Helgeland?s biopic 42.
Australian sensation Margot Robbie, the youngest actress to grace this year?s Hollywood cover, metamorphosed into the Duchess of Bay Ridge in Martin Scorsese?s Oscar-nominated The Wolf of Wall Street.
Léa Seydoux […]

And the BAFTA Award Winners are…

Argo was named Best Film at tonight’s EE British Academy Film Awards hosted by Stephen Fry, held at London’s Royal Opera House. And the British Academy of Film and Television Arts award winners are…
BEST FILM
WINNER – ARGO Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck, George Clooney
LES MISÉRABLES Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh
LIFE OF PI Gil Netter, Ang Lee, David Womark
LINCOLN Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy
ZERO DARK THIRTY Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow, Megan Ellison
OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM
ANNA KARENINA Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster, Tom Stoppard
THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL John Madden, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Ol Parker
LES MISÉRABLES Tom Hooper, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh, William Nicholson, Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schönberg, Herbert Kretzmer
SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
WINNER – SKYFALL Sam Mendes, Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Broccoli, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan
OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER
WINNER – BART LAYTON (Director), DIMITRI DOGANIS (Producer) The Imposter
DAVID MORRIS (Director), JACQUI MORRIS (Director/Producer) McCullin
DEXTER FLETCHER (Director/Writer), DANNY KING (Writer) Wild Bill
JAMES BOBIN (Director) The Muppets
TINA GHARAVI (Director/Writer) I Am Nasrine
FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
WINNER – *AMOUR Michael Haneke, Margaret Ménégoz
HEADHUNTERS Morten Tyldum, Marianne Gray, Asle Vatn
THE HUNT Thomas Vinterberg, Sisse Graum Jørgensen, Morten Kaufmann
RUST AND BONE Jacques Audiard, Pascal Caucheteux
UNTOUCHABLE Eric Toledano, Olivier Nakache, Nicolas Duval Adassovsky, Yann Zenou, Laurent Zeitoun
DOCUMENTARY
THE IMPOSTER Bart Layton, Dimitri Doganis
MARLEY Kevin Macdonald, Steve Bing, Charles Steel
McCULLIN David Morris, Jacqui Morris
WINNER – SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN Malik Bendjelloul, Simon Chinn
WEST OF MEMPHIS Amy Berg
ANIMATED FILM
WINNER – BRAVE Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman
FRANKENWEENIE Tim Burton
PARANORMAN Sam Fell, Chris Butler
DIRECTOR
AMOUR Michael Haneke
WINNER – ARGO Ben Affleck
DJANGO UNCHAINED Quentin Tarantino
LIFE OF PI Ang Lee
ZERO DARK THIRTY Kathryn Bigelow
ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
AMOUR Michael Haneke
WINNER – DJANGO UNCHAINED Quentin Tarantino
THE MASTER Paul Thomas Anderson
MOONRISE KINGDOM Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola
ZERO DARK THIRTY Mark Boal
ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
ARGO Chris Terrio
BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin
LIFE OF PI David Magee
LINCOLN Tony Kushner
WINNER – SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK David O. Russell
LEADING ACTOR
BEN AFFLECK Argo
BRADLEY COOPER Silver Linings Playbook
WINNER – DANIEL DAY-LEWIS Lincoln
HUGH JACKMAN Les Misérables
JOAQUIN PHOENIX The Master
LEADING ACTRESS
WINNER – EMMANUELLE RIVA Amour
HELEN MIRREN Hitchcock
JENNIFER LAWRENCE Silver Linings Playbook
JESSICA CHASTAIN Zero Dark Thirty
MARION COTILLARD Rust and Bone
SUPPORTING ACTOR
ALAN ARKIN Argo
WINNER – CHRISTOPH WALTZ Django Unchained
JAVIER BARDEM Skyfall
PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN The Master
TOMMY LEE JONES Lincoln
SUPPORTING ACTRESS
AMY ADAMS The Master
WINNER – ANNE HATHAWAY Les Misérables
HELEN HUNT The Sessions
JUDI DENCH Skyfall
SALLY FIELD Lincoln
ORIGINAL MUSIC
ANNA KARENINA Dario Marianelli
ARGO Alexandre Desplat
LIFE OF […]

Producers Guild of America Awards announce winners

Tonight the Producers Guild of America (PGA) announced this year’s winning motion picture and television productions at the 24th Annual Producers Guild Awards ceremony held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles.
In addition to the competitive awards, the PGA recognized several producers with honorary awards including Bob and Harvey Weinstein (Milestone Award), Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner (David O. Selznick Achievement Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures), J.J. Abrams (Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television), Russell Simmons (Visionary Award), and BULLY (Stanley Kramer Award). The 2013 Producers Guild Awards were chaired by Michael De Luca.
The 2013 Producers Guild nominated films and television programs are listed below in alphabetical order by category, along with producers. The producers’ names for each nominated production are listed in alphabetical order and may not reflect the order of screen credits. The winners are indicated in bold and with an asterisk (*).
The theatrical motion picture nominees and winners are:
The Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures:
* ARGO (Warner Bros.)
Producers: Ben Affleck, George Clooney, Grant Heslov
BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
Producers: Michael Gottwald, Dan Janvey, Josh Penn
DJANGO UNCHAINED (The Weinstein Company)
Producers: Reginald Hudlin, Pilar Savone, Stacey Sher
LES MISÉRABLES (Universal Pictures)
Producers: Tim Bevan & Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward, Cameron Mackintosh
LIFE OF PI (Fox 2000 Pictures)
Producers: Ang Lee, Gil Netter, David Womark
LINCOLN (Touchstone Pictures)
Producers: Kathleen Kennedy, Steven Spielberg
MOONRISE KINGDOM (Focus Features)
Producers: Wes Anderson & Scott Rudin, Jeremy Dawson, Steven Rales
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (The Weinstein Company)
Producers: Bruce Cohen, Donna Gigliotti, Jonathan Gordon
SKYFALL (Columbia Pictures)
Producers: Barbara Broccoli, Michael G. Wilson
ZERO DARK THIRTY (Columbia Pictures)
Producers: Kathryn Bigelow, Mark Boal, Megan Ellison
The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures:
BRAVE (Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)
Producer: Katherine Sarafian
FRANKENWEENIE (Walt Disney Pictures)
Producers: Allison Abbate, Tim Burton
PARANORMAN (Focus Features)
Producers: Travis Knight, Arianne Sutner
RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (Paramount Pictures)
Producers: Nancy Bernstein, Christina Steinberg
* WRECK-IT RALPH (Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)
Producer: Clark Spencer
The Award for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures:
A PEOPLE UNCOUNTED (Urbinder Films)
Producers: Marc Swenker, Aaron Yeger
THE GATEKEEPERS (Sony Pictures Classics)
Producers: Estelle Fialon, Philippa Kowarsky, Dror Moreh
THE ISLAND PRESIDENT (Samuel Goldwyn Films)
Producers: Richard Berge, Bonni Cohen
THE OTHER DREAM TEAM (The Film Arcade)
Producers: Marius Markevicius, Jon Weinbach
* SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN (Sony Pictures Classics)
Producers: Malik Bendjelloul, Simon Chinn
The television nominees and winners are:
The David L. Wolper Award for Outstanding Producer of Long-Form Television:
“American Horror Story” (FX)
Producers: […]

Page 1 of 2612345...1020...Last »