April 17, 2014

Tag Archives: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

The Dark Knight Rises opens with $160 million

HollywoodNews.com:This was edited from a phone, so pardon any formatting errors. When a heavily-anticipated film debuts alongside a mass murder that takes place during a midnight showing of said film, it’s difficult to know how to analyze the opening weekend figures. I don’t mean morally speaking (all due respect, anyone offended by number crunching after such a tragedy shouldn’t be clicking on a link entitled ‘Weekend Box Office’), I mean practically. Under normal circumstances, the fact that The Dark Knight Rises debuted with $160 million over the weekend would lend itself to the usual analysis, dealing with weekend multipliers, midnight-percentages, comparisons to The Dark Knight and other recent blockbusters, and a guesstimate in regards to final domestic outcome. But it is impossible for now to know what the effect of the shooting had on the film’s short term or long term box office performance, so for the sake of this calculation, we will basically presume that the shooting had little quantifiable effect on the numbers, and frankly looking over the data I’m inclined to believe as much. The film did about as well, give-or-take, as it would have been expected to do. But the numbers, presuming little-to-no effect from Friday morning’s tragedy, means that the third Chris Nolan Batman film was a slightly less anticipated affair than the last go-around, which will likely bode comparatively ill for long-term grosses. Basically, horror of horrors, The Dark Knight Rises might just perform like a normal mega-blockbuster.
To wit, The Dark Knight Rises debuted with $30.4 million in midnight showings (second only to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II’s $43 million midnight-haul) and ended its first complete Friday with $75 million, good for the third-biggest single day of all time, behind The Avengers ($80 million) and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II ($91 million). Considering The Dark Knight Rises was in 2D, it surely sold more tickets on Friday than The Avengers and may have sold more than Harry Potter 7.2 (we’ll know for sure in a few days). The film earned 40% of its Friday figure via midnight showings, identical to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part I ($24 million at midnight, $62 million on Friday) and just ahead of all-time worst midnight-percentage opening days Harry Potter 7.2 ($43m/$91m = 45%) and Twilight Saga: Eclipse ($30m/$68m = 44%). [...]

The Avengers followed up its $18.7 million midnight haul with a $80.5 million gross for its first full day

HollywoodNews.com: Ten years ago we had the first $100 million opening weekend. Five years ago we had the first $150 million opening weekend. This weekend, we may be looking at the first $200 million Fri-Sun opening weekend. The Avengers followed up its $18.7 million midnight haul with a $80.5 million gross for its first full day. That’s the second-biggest single day on record, behind the $92 million opening sprint for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II. It’s also by far the largest single-day gross not counting midnight screenings.
Even if you negate the midnight haul, The Avengers still grossed $61 million during ‘regular business hours’. For example, The Dark Knight earned $18.5 million at midnight and $67 million for its first full Friday, giving it a $49 million ‘normal day’ Friday figure. Among the various single day champions in recent years: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II ($92m – $43m = $49 million), Spider-Man 3 ($59m – $10m = $48m), The Hunger Games ($67m – $19.75m = $48m), and The Twilight Saga: New Moon ($72m – $26m = $46m). As you can see, The Avengers is so-far actually far less front-loaded than all of them, meaning it is playing less like a heavily-anticipated geek-centric smash and more like a general audiences mega-hit. Point being, the three-day opening weekend record ($169 million for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II) is still very much in jeopardy.
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Marvel’s The Avengers midnight gross

HollywoodNews.com: The unofficial midnight gross for Marvel’s The Avengers is $18.7 million. That’s the eighth-biggest such midnight haul on record. The seven ahead of it are The Hunger Games ($19.7 million), Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince ($22 million), Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part I ($24 million), The Twilight Saga: New Moon ($26 million), The Twilight Saga: Eclipse ($30 million), The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn part I ($30 million), and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II ($43 million). Obviously The Avengers was never going to top the midnight-grossers list, and its worth noting that the film earned more on its midnight debut that pretty much every prior Marvel Studios movie combined (Offhand, Thor earned $3.5 million, Captain America earned $4 million, and Iron Man 2 earned $7.5 million in their respective midnight debuts). It’s a larger midnight, just barely and likely due to inflation and the 3D-price bump, then The Dark Knight, which broke a midnight record four years ago with $18.5 million on its way to a $67 million opening day and a $158 million opening weekend (both records at the time).

Unless the film is front-loaded on the level of a Harry Potter sequel or a Twilight sequel, we’re looking at a $140-160 million debut here. But is the three-day record still in play? Let’s whip out the calculator!
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The Hunger Games topped the box office for the third time in a row

HollywoodNews.com: Whatever my issues with The Hunger Games in terms of its quality as a film, its continued box office might can only be a good thing. Considering the current trend of studios basically remaking/rebooting/rehashing every remotely popular property over the last thirty years, the fact that this NEW adaptation from a NEW novel is going to be among the top three grossing films of the year by a healthy margin can only be a good lesson. Anyway, The Hunger Games topped the box office for the third time in a row this weekend, dropping a perfectly reasonable 43% in weekend three, for a weekend haul of $33.5 million. This gives the film a massive $302 million in seventeen days, which is the second-largest such haul for a film outside of summer in history. That’s the fifth-biggest seventeen-day total in history, and 11 days ahead of Alice In Wonderland, the closest non-summer competitor and just two days behind Avatar. Forget Twilight comparisons, it’s already passed Eclipse, which is the highest-grossing entry in the series. And forget the majority of the Harry Potter series, as it’s $14 million away from surpassing Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and it’s already tied with the $303 million 17-day total of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II with significantly larger second and third weekends to boot. At this point, it’s playing like Spider-Man 2 and the last Harry Potter film, with stronger weekends but lighter weekday grosses. The second Spidey pick ended its third weekend with $302 million and ended its domestic haul with $373 million, while Harry Potter 7.2 ended with $381 million. Factoring a rather busy April and the coming summer onslaught, that’s as good a place to predict as to where the first The Hunger Games ends up.
The top opener, one of two wide releases, was American Reunion. The unasked-for sequel is the fourth theatrical entry in the American Pie series but the eighth chapter counting the four direct-to-DVD films. This ‘most of you need a paycheck because none of you really broke out’ rehash opened to $21 million, which is almost identical to the $19 million debut this time last year of Scream 4. To be fair, at least some of the cast has worked relatively steadily since 1999, with Alyson Hannigan going from one [...]

The Hunger Games again topped the box office this weekend

By Scott Mendelson
HollywoodNews.com: As expected, The Hunger Games again topped the box office this weekend, but its relatively strong hold suggests that it may be a bit mightier than a conventional Twilight/Harry Potter sequel. With $61 million in weekend two (the eighth-biggest non-opening weekend ever, ahead of all the respective Harry Potter and Twilight Saga films), the film dropped 60% and ended day ten with a whopping $251 million. That’s the biggest ten-day total for a non-sequel ever, and the fifth-biggest ever. It came in above the $240 million ten-day total of Spider-Man 3, and it is that film which its performance most resembles. Spider-Man 3 opened with $151 million in May of 2007 before dropping 61% for a $58 million weekend. Spidey took a drop on weekend two despite having no new releases to compete against because it wasn’t exclaimed critically-acclaimed among the fanbase. The Hunger Games had two big releases this weekend, plus the loss of its IMAX screens which represented about 7% of its theaters and 10% of its gross last weekend. No other mega-opener on this level that benefited from IMAX has had to deal with the immediate loss of those premium screens, so it bares mention when comparing it to the respective second weekends of The Dark Knight ($75 million off a $158 million debut) or Alice In Wonderland ($62 million off a $116 million debut). Spider-Man 3 ended its domestic run with $336 million, and its ten day total represented 71% of the gross. Giving The Hunger Games a similar pattern would give this franchise-starter a final domestic cume of $353 million. We’ll see how it weathers the 3D reissue of Titanic next weekend. Oh, and it’s up to $365 million worldwide, all on a mere $90 million budget.
The top new release was Wrath of the Titans (review/trailer) which earned $34.2 million via its 2D, 3D, and IMAX screens. That’s 55% of the $61 million that Clash of the Titans earned two years ago on its opening weekend. That film had a terrific marketing campaign and benefited from being one of the first films to toy with 3D conversion in the wake of Avatar. Of course, the film grossed nearly $500 million worldwide but earned scorn for its quick and cheap-looking 3D work. The film had better-than-expected legs partially [...]

The Hunger Games opened this weekend with a scorching $155 million

By Scott Mendelson
Besting any number of opening weekend records, The Hunger Games (review HERE) opened this weekend with a scorching $155 million. That’s the third-biggest opening weekend of all-time, behind The Dark Knight ($158 million) and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II ($169 million). Obviously by virtue of being number 03 on the list, it’s also the biggest opening weekend for a non-summer movie, a non-sequel. It’s of course the biggest debut in history for a film not released by Warner Bros. during the third weekend in July, for those keeping release-date score. It’s also Lionsgate’s highest-grossing film ever after just three days, besting the $123 million-debut of Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11. While it’s Lionsgate’s most expensive movie, it’s still an example of smart budgeting as it came it at $90 million before tax credits which brought the total exposure to just $78 million. Even if you factor in the hardcore marketing campaign over the last month, Lionsgate is surely in the black or will be by Friday, making everything after this pure profit. There isn’t too much to say because this record debut has been prognosticated to the point of tedium over the last two months, as one tracking report after another continually upped the predicted opening weekend number, to the point where the film would have been called a ‘flop’ if it hadn’t opened with at least $100 million (not by me, mind you). But yeah, Lionsgate pulled some of the best marketing in modern history (teaser/trailer01/trailer02), turning a relatively popular young adult book series into a mainstream media ‘event’, which in turn made the film adaptation into a must-sample event even for audiences who only had token knowledge of the series.
Here’s the breakdown. The film pulled in $19.75 million at midnight on Friday night, and then pulled in $68.3 million on its opening day (the fifth-biggest Friday ever). The film held surprisingly strong on Saturday earning another $51 million, or down 25% from the Friday total but actually up 5% from the $48.5 million that the film earned during normal business hours on Friday. By the way, that non-midnight Friday total was the third-biggest on record, behind The Dark Knight ($48.7 million) and Spider-Man 3 ($49.8 million) and ahead of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II ($43 million at midnight, $47.5 million [...]

Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter influence a decade of blockbusters

By Scott Mendelson
HollywoodNews.com: This is the final entry in a handful of essays that will be dealing with the various trends that were kicked off during the 2001 calendar year, and how they still resonate today.
Yesterday (the 19th) marked the tenth anniversary of the US theatrical release of The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring. It was just over a month after the US theatrical release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, which had debuted with a record-breaking $92 million opening weekend. Debuting with a December-record $72 million five-day haul, The Fellowship of the Ring parlayed superb reviews and splendid word of mouth to break a number of Christmas and New Year’s season records and show off some of the best legs this side of Titanic and The Sixth Sense. These two films, which closed out the year, would directly or indirectly pave the way for the next full decade of would-be blockbuster filmmaking. At last, we had reached a point where basically anything was possibly onscreen if you had enough money and (ideally) enough talent. The culmination of every trend discussed in the prior essays (the gutting of the R-rating, the explosion in opening weekend box office potential, the emergence of overseas box office dominance, the mainstreaming of ‘family entertainment’ etc) was personified in the massive success of these two big-budget fantasy pictures. Whether based on a novel, a comic book, or a theme park ride, big-budget fantasy spectaculars were about to become the dominant tentpole of choice.
I’m not going to spend paragraph after paragraph discussing why Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter resonated with audiences (IE – why they were both so damn good), both because I’ve done so on several occasions and because if you don’t believe it now, this essay isn’t going to change your mind. But the two noted blockbuster films and their respective massive successes had a number of effects, for better or worse. They normalized the $300 million domestic-earner, they basically sent every studio scrambling to find their next fantasy franchise, and they led to what I like to call ‘the trilogy trend’. Obviously this applies to the Lord of the Rings trilogy more than the eight-part Harry Potter series, but what followed in ‘blockbuster-land’ was an incessant need to turn every big-scale picture not just into a series of continuing [...]

Oscars: “Harry Potter” harbors legitimate Best Picture dreams – AWARDS ALLEY

By Sean O’Connell
hollywoodnews.com: Did “Return of the King” blaze a trail that “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2” – the eighth and final installment in the beloved film franchise – can walk on down?
The theory is being tested by Warner Bros. as the Oscar season continues to develop. For Your Consideration ads have been running on the trade Web sites for weeks. Screener copies of “Deathly Hallows, Part 2” have arrived in key guild mailboxes ahead of end-of-year voting. Screenings are being held in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and London, giving voters a chance to see David Yates’ accomplishment on the big screen (as was intended).
Consider this, as well. The studio might have little choice but to pour its collective weight behind the final “Harry Potter” as its most likely Best Picture candidate. (“J. Edgar” likely will not get there, and Stephen Daldry’s “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” remains a mystery.)
Which brings us back to the Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings,” which earned its Oscars at the culmination of a lengthy journey. Eleven victories, including Best Picture, Director, Screenplay and several below-the-line categories … where the “Harry Potter” series has left its mark.
Until now.
“Historically, the movies have all been received as much more of a commercial venture as opposed to an artistic one,” Sue Kroll, Warners’ president of worldwide marketing, tells THR. “But I do think this newest film is different. It’s been one of the best-reviewed movies of the year. It really was an artistic breakthrough.”
The film also has the box office necessary to compete, earning $381 million domestically, the highest total in franchise history. And “Part 2” earned a staggering 96% Fresh, with only 10 of the 266 filed reviews counting toward the negative.
Are there places “Potter” can compete if it doesn’t make the Bets Picture cut? Absolutely. Alan Rickman earned the most raves for his franchise-spanning performance as Severus Snape. Ralph Fiennes and Daniel Radcliffe each flirted with awards consideration for their reprisals of Harry Potter and Lord Voldemort, respectively.
But Warner would be wise to roll its dice on the evening’s biggest prize: Best Picture. A current frontrunner has yet to emerge from the pack this year, suggesting we might see an Oscar ceremony that spreads its love around to multiple pictures. If ever there would be a year where the winners in the Actor, Actress, Supporting [...]

Harry Potter “Making Of” studio almost ready for fans

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: Harry Potter may be gone, but he’s hardly forgotten. Fans of the Boy Who Lived have ample opportunities to revisit the magical hero, from theme parks in Orlando to the original books that inspired the movie franchise. And soon enough, they’ll have another avenue to exercise their Potter passion.
Workers are putting the finishing touches on the official “Making of Harry Potter” studio tour, which will be housed in a facility outside of London, the AP reports. With assistance from Warner Bros., this museum of all things Potter will include authentic sets, props, costumes and more from the eight-film series. And all of it will be located in the site of the original filming.
“I get shudders down my spine every time I walk back in there,” said Tom Felton, who played Draco Malfoy in all eight films. “Immediately, as soon as you go back it just fires up a decade’s worth of memories.
“I remember the first time I went in there — it was on camera. (Director) Chris Columbus specifically didn’t want us to see it before filming, because we were only 11-year-old kids,” Felton continued. “So, our reaction when we walked in there was pretty much genuine.”
Fans will be able to walk through the Great Hall of Hogwarts, the Ministry of Magic, the cupboard under the stairs that Harry called home, and several more cherished sets at the facility, which will open on March 31.
A Web site allowing fans to book tickets recently went online but experienced technical difficulties, which the studio blamed on high traffic.
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Emma Watson voted most likely to succeed beyond “Harry Potter” franchise

By Kim Palacios
hollywoodnews.com: Emma Watson, who played Hermione Granger in more than eight “Harry Potter” films has been voted by an overwhelming majority (via the Parade 2011 Pop Culture Poll) as the actor most likely to succeed beyond the franchise.
Not only was Watson the landslide winner, with a confidence vote of 79%, only 2% of those polled believed her co-star Rupert Grint, who played Ron Weasley, was most likely to succeed. Making up the balance was Daniel Radcliffe, who acted the role of the franchise’s namesake. Only 18% of respondents thought Radcliffe was most likely to succeed outside of “Harry Potter” fame.
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