July 21, 2015
        Alejandro G. Iñárritu and "The Revenant, " starring Leo DiCaprio, announce themselves as big players with a breathtaking Trailer                'Minions' No. 1 With $116.4 in Global Box Office                "Irrational Man" and back: Ranking the films of Woody Allen                Carlos de Abreu Receives "Diploma de Merito" from the President of Portugal                "The Stanford Prison Experiment": One of the best indie films of 2015 so far                "Ant-Man" is Marvel's latest success story and one of their better releases                "Trainwreck" is Judd Apatow's best to date and Amy Schumer deserves awards attention                Ben Affleck is the perfect choice to direct a new "Batman" film                MADONNA Releases "Bitch I'm Madonna"                Ridley Scott: Looking at potential Best Director contenders                The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced its newly elected 2015–16 Board of Governors                Robin Williams gives us one last cinematic gift with "Boulevard"                Which early year releases will remain Oscar players throughout 2015?                Ava DuVernay looks to carve out her own path by turning down Marvel's "Black Panther"                Jerry Weintraub - Goodbye Good Friend        

Tag Archives: oil wealth

Oliver Stone’s response to Leopoldo Lopez

HollywoodNews.com: Below is Oliver Stone’s response to Leopoldo Lopez from The Huffington Post:
CLICK HERE TO READ LEOPOLDO LOPEZ’S CHALLENGE TO OLIVER STONE
Leopoldo López, a right-wing opposition leader in Venezuela who supported the military overthrow of the democratically elected government there in 2002, complains about my film (South of the Border), saying “Mr. Stone argues that the assault on human rights is of secondary concern.”
But my film argues the opposite. It’s just that the “assault on human rights” in Venezuela has come from the right, from Mr. Lopez and his allies. One of the first decrees by the coup government that Mr. Lopez supported was to abolish the elected Congress and the Supreme Court. Protesters were shot, and officials of the constitutional government arrested. And the victims of political violence to this day in Venezuela are also victims of the right – mostly poor peasants organizing for land reform, killed by landowners.
The struggle in Venezuela is not so much about one man, President Hugo Chávez, as the right would have us believe. It is a political battle between the left and the right. Not surprisingly, as in the rest of South America, it is the right that has the ugly record on human rights and issues of democracy. And it is the right that represents the rich — López was former mayor of one of the wealthiest areas of Caracas — against the majority of the people, much as in the United States.
Mr. López offers a “Tea Party” view of Venezuela, in which everything that is wrong with the country is the fault of the left government, and Chávez — like Obama for the Tea Partiers — is a “dictator.” López is very selective in his use of statistics. He does not tell the reader that since the Chávez government got control over the national oil industry, poverty has been cut in half, extreme poverty by more than 70 percent, and thousands of doctors added to the public sector now provide health care for the poor.
Some of his statistics are misleading. For example, the 650 percent increase in prices he refers to is an average of 19 percent annual inflation. This is high, but much lower than the pre-Chávez years, where inflation passed 100 percent in 1996. Most importantly, it is real economic growth, not the price level, that matters; and inflation did not prevent the country’s record growth from 2003-2008 […]