August 26, 2016

Tag Archives: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Tom Hardy: His best performances to date

It only took a few years, but once audiences got a good look at Tom Hardy, it was just a matter of time before he became a star. Now, he’s an A-lister hoping for his first Academy Award nomination this year, either for The Revenant or this week’s release, the gangster tale Legend. The former is a much more likely Oscar player than the latter, but anything is possible. With Hardy having a baity role to show us on Friday, I wanted to cite him a bit, list his best performances so far, and give him another quick moment in the sun here on the site…
Legend is the story of British gangsters and identical twins Reggie and Ronnie Kray (both played by Hardy), two of the country’s most notorious criminals. During the 1960’s, the Kray brothers developed a criminal empire on the East End of London. Brian Helgeland writes and directs, while the cast aside from Hardy pulling double duty includes Emily Browning, Christopher Eccleston, Taron Egerton, Chazz Palminteri, David Thewlis, and more. Dick Pope handles the cinematography, while the score is by Carter Burwell. Obviously though, this is a showcase for Hardy, doing the type of acting that oftentimes can attract Oscar buzz. Early reviews suggest that won’t happen, but anything is possible. We’ll see what happens this week when audiences stateside get a look at it after international audiences have had it roll out over the last couple of months.
More than likely, if Hardy gets his first nomination in 2015, it will be for his supporting role in The Revenant, in which he co-stars with Leonardo DiCaprio. That one is co-written and directed by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, who obviously attracted the Academy in a big way last year. Hardy seems to have a pretty baity role, so the potential is there, it’s just a matter of waiting to see it. I’m fairly confident that if all goes well, the list you’ll see below of his best performances will have to be updated to include this one. Until then, we just sit tight.
As previously mentioned last year in a piece specifically on him, Hardy got his start when he was picked for a role in Band of Brothers, pretty much being plucked out of obscurity. He appeared in two episodes of the miniseries, which marked his debut as an actor. His small part in Black Hawk Down was his […]

Cinematography Race Gives “Sicario”’s Roger Deakins a Chance to Earn Lucky Nomination # 13

Cinematography is perhaps the most revered of cinematic art forms. The reason for this is simple – our films would literally not exist without the camera. From crafting mood and atmosphere to wowing us with the sheer ability to have “pulled off” a shot, cinematographers (also known as directors of photography or “D.P.s”) are the amazing talents responsible for realizing a director’s vision through command of the camera. And after the director, D.P.s are arguably the most important person on a film’s set.
The cinematographers’ branch in the Academy is a group that loves epic luscious landscapes and war films. The branch is also relatively keen on foreign-language titles. And there is usually – though by no means always – significant overlap between the Cinematography race and the Best Picture race. (An unfortunate bizarre fact – this is the only Oscar category outside of Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor that has never featured a female nominee, while every other has featured a winner. Anywho, on to the contenders…)
One likely nominee is wrapping up its first week in theatres. Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario” allowed the great Roger Deakins to create a hectic, gritty world with amazing shots (particularly those night shots!) that built the mood oh-so-well. A twelve-time nominee who was nominated for his last collaboration with Villeneuve (“Prisoners”), I suspect Deakins will once against find himself in the race.
Unfortunately, Deakins may have a difficult time finally getting that statuette on his mantle. The favorite in this category is likely back-to-back winner Emmanuel Lubezki, seeking win #3 for Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s “The Reverent.” Fresh off wins for “Birdman” and “Gravity,” the exceptionally talented Lubezki is seeking to recreate the early 1800s American West. That sounds intriguing enough. It’s going to feature harrowing scenes and scenery, all under the watchful eyes of Lubezki and Iñárritu. And from what we’ve seen, it indeed looks like a visual feast.
Another director who is known to get the most of camerawork is, of course, Quentin Tarantino. One of the last directors insisting on using film as opposed to digital technology, “The Hateful Eight” is only going to re-emphasize his approach to filmmaking, being released in ultra-wide format. Robert Richardson earned nominations six and eight for “Inglourious Basterds” and “Django Unchained,” respectively (he’s won for “JFK,” “The Aviator,” and “Hugo”). This latest title will present many opportunities for epic landscapes and showy, mood-building scenes. And there’s the scope. […]

Spotlight on the Stars: Tom Hardy

For this week’s spotlight piece, I wanted to take a look at an up and coming A-lister, someone who’s a big star on his way to becoming an even bigger one. He’s Tom Hardy, an incredibly well respected and intense actor. It’s probably a shock to many that Hardy has yet to be cited with an Academy Award nomination (or even a Golden Globe nomination for that matter), but that speaks to how great the work is already. With another fine performance this year coming to theaters, now seems like a perfect time to take a look at Hardy, so let’s shine a spotlight on him right now!
Hardy got his start when he was picked for a role in Band of Brothers, pretty much being plucked out of obscurity. He appeared in two episodes of the miniseries, which marked his debut as an actor. His small part in Black Hawk Down was his first time on the big screen, though obviously it wouldn’t be his last. He even had a huge role come his way the next year, playing the main villain in Star Trek: Nemesis. The next couple of years would see him take supporting parts in films like Layer Cake, Marie Antoinette, and RocknRolla, but they were all warm ups for his real introduction.
That would come when he played the title role in the prison movie Bronson. His performance so stunned audiences and critics alike that suddenly he was a name that was on the tip of just about everyone’s tongue. Hardy was a star in the making, someone who’d shown he had talent that ranks among the best of anyone in his generation. Many had tipped him for an Oscar nomination, and although it didn’t happen, his work on that flick shot him right to the front of the line when it came to consideration for major roles. He wasn’t just going to cash a paycheck and call it a day though. No, Hardy was going to continue to pick and choose his jobs carefully.
His next major role came a few years later when Christopher Nolan picked him for one of the notable parts in his mind bender Inception. Using his charismatic turn as almost another audition of sorts, Nolan then put Hardy in the final installment of his Batman franchise, getting him to play antagonist Bane in The Dark Knight Rises. Between those two works […]

The 84th Academy Awards: If I had been a voter

Once again today I’m going to be taking a look back at a recent Oscar lineup and explaining what my vote would have been in each of the big eight categories we all follow so intently each season. I previously mentioned that potentially I could do this once a week with previous Academy Award ceremonies, and while I’m going to be truing to do that, time will still tell. Again, if nothing else, this gives you an interesting look into my cinematic tastes. Over the course of the year you can sort of get a feel for what my current favorites are, but now we can look to the past a bit more.
Alright, here goes nothing:
Best Picture – Moneyball
The nominees here for this ceremony were The Artist, The Descendants, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, The Help, Hugo, Midnight in Paris, Moneyball, The Tree of Life, and War Horse. Obviously The Artist took it in real life, and Drive would have been my clear pick had it been nominated, but if I had been a voter my choice would have been between The Descendants, Midnight in Paris, and Moneyball. At the time, The Descendants would have been my pick, but now I think I lean towards Moneyball, so that would wind up getting my vote for Best Picture.
Best Director – Alexander Payne for The Descendants
I’d have voted for Nicolas Winding Refn here for Drive, but unsurprisingly he wasn’t nominated. The actual nominees were Woody Allen for Midnight in Paris, Michel Hazanavicius for The Artist, Terrence Malick for The Tree of Life, Alexander Payne for The Descendants, and Martin Scorsese for Hugo. Without Refn, I don’t have anyone I’m too wild about, but I think Payne might be the best of the bunch. The aforementioned Refn is easily my personal pick overall, but Payne is my choice of the actual nominees.
Best Actor – Brad Pitt for Moneyball
In a perfect world, I’d have seen either Michael Fassbender rewarded for Shame, Ryan Gosling in the lineup for Drive, Tom Hardy cited for Warrior, or Michael Parks in for Red State and subsequently any of them would have been my vote (likely Fassbender), but such is life. The actual nominees here though were Demián Bichir for A Better Life, George Clooney for The Descendants, Jean Dujardin for The Artist, Gary Oldman for Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and Brad Pitt for Moneyball. The choice of these […]

Under the Radar: Tom Hardy

Today I’m going to be pressing on with another series for you all here at the site, one that I started last week. Basically, it’s a spinoff of the Spotlight on the Stars series. As a quick refresher, each week I look at an actor/actress/filmmaker that I’d like to celebrate in some kind of way. It could be due to something of theirs coming out that weekend (like in many of the cases so far, including today) or just because I feel they deserve to have a moment in the sun all their own, but each time it’ll be a bit of positivity about someone who I’d like to pay tribute to. Here though, I’m going to look at more of an under the radar individual as opposed to a tried and true star.
For this week’s sophomore piece, I wanted to take a look at our first actor getting the treatment in this particular way…Tom Hardy. Frankly, not nearly enough people know who he is, despite some very high profile roles. He has the ability to morph with each role, so pinning him down can be tricky. He’s been a hero, a villain, a romantic lead, and just about everything in between. This is a chameleon of an actor, one who seems up for anything and basically is a filmmaker’s dream.
Hardy first showed up on screens in Star Trek: Nemesis, followed by small parts in films like Layer Cake, Marie Antoinette, RocknRolla, and Sucker Punch, though it wasn’t until he burst on to the scene with his searing performance in Bronson that people really started to take notice. From there, he was officially someone to watch (along with becoming a bit of a critics darling), and boy has he not disappointed.
Since that breakthrough role, he has wound up in such diverse fare as The Dark Knight Rises, Inception, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and Warrior, not to mention lighter things like This Means War. Especially in The Dark Knight Rises and Warrior, Hardy has been outstanding, along with Bronson, those are his three finest performances to date, though this week he has another tremendous bit of acting hitting screens, one that’s well deserving of a top five spot in his filmography.
Now, it appears that Hardy is interested in expanding his range even more, as seen by the one man show that is Locke, which opens this weekend. It’s essentially him and […]

Oscars: “The Artist” prevails on an uneven night – AWARDS ALLEY

By Sean O’Connell
hollywoodnews.com: Michel Hazanavicius’ “The Artist” lost a number of key technical categories to Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo” but still prevailed in the top Oscar slot on Sunday night, claiming trophies for Best Picture, Director, and Actor (for Jean Dujardin).
It was a great night for Harvey Weinstein, who helped power Meryl Streep to an unexpected win over perceived frontrunner Viola Davis on the Best Actress race. Octavia Spencer (“The Help”) and Christopher Plummer (“Beginners”) rounded out last night’s acting categories.
I went 19 out of 24 in my picks, believing the Academy would spread a lot of its technical love around to films not named “Hugo.” All is all, a successful Oscar season. Here are the winners from the 84th Annual Academy Awards (bolded below):
Best Picture
“The Artist”
“The Descendants”
“Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close”
“Hugo”
“Midnight In Paris”
“The Help”
“Moneyball”
“War Horse”
“The Tree of Life”
Best Actor
Demian Bichir, “A Better Life”
George Clooney, “The Descendants”
Jean Dujardin, “The Artist”
Gary Oldman, “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”
Brad Pitt, “Moneyball”
Best Actress
Glenn Close, “Albert Nobbs”
Viola Davis, “The Help”
Rooney Mara, “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”
Meryl Streep, “The Iron Lady”
Michelle Williams, “My Week With Marilyn”
Best Director
Woody Allen, “Midnight in Paris”
Michel Hazanavicius, “The Artist”
Terrence Malick, “The Tree of Life”
Alexander Payne, “The Descendants”
Martin Scorsese, “Hugo”
Best Supporting Actor
Kenneth Branagh, “My Week With Marilyn”
Jonah Hill, “Moneyball”
Nick Nolte, “Warrior”
Christopher Plummer, “Beginners”
Max Von Sydow, “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close”
Best Supporting Actress
Berenice Bejo, “The Artist”
Jessica Chastain, “The Help”
Melissa McCarthy, “Bridesmaids”
Janet McTeer, “Albert Nobbs”
Octavia Spencer, “The Help”
Best Original Screenplay
Woody Allen, “Midnight in Paris”
JC Chandor, “Margin Call”
Asghar Farhadi, “A Separation”
Michel Hazanavicius, “The Artist”
Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo, “Bridesmaids”
Best Adapted Screenplay
Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon, Jim Rash, “The Descendants”
John Logan, “Hugo”
George Clooney, Grant Heslov, “The Ides of March”
Aaron Sorkin, Steven Zaillian, “Moneyball”
Bridget O’Connor, Peter Straughn, “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”
Best Animated Feature
“A Cat In Paris”
“Chico & Rita”
“Kung Fu Panda 2”
“Puss in Boots”
“Rango”
Best Foreign Feature
“Bullhead” (Belgium)
“Footnote” (Israel)
“In Darkness” (Poland)
“Monsiuer Lazhar” (Canada)
“A Separation” (Iran)
Best Art Direction
“The Artist”
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”
“Hugo”
“Midnight in Paris”
“War Horse”
Best Cinematography
“The Artist”
“The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”
“Hugo”
“The Tree of Life”
“War Horse”
Best Costume Design
“Anonymous”
“The Artist”
“Hugo”
“Jane Eyre”
“W.E.”
Best Documentary Feature
“Hell and Back Again”
“If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front”
“Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory”
“Pina”
“Undefeated”
Best Documentary Short
“The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement”
“God Is the Bigger Elvis”
“Incident in New Baghdad”
“Saving Face”
“The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom”
Best Film Editing
“The Artist”
“The Descendants”
“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”
“Hugo”
“Moneyball”
Best Make-Up
“Albert Nobbs”
“Harry Potter […]

And the Oscars will go to … — AWARDS ALLEY

By Sean O’Connell
hollywoodnews.com: Do or die time. After month and months of tracking the Oscar race, it’s time to put up (and shut up) by posting my official picks for Sunday night’s Academy Awards.
And while I have been saying (OK, complaining) that too many of tonight’s winners are all but predetermined, there’s still a few mysteries to be solved, primarily in the below-the-line categories, where deserving films could take home Oscar gold.
So, without further ado, here are my selections for tonight’s winners, bolded in each category. I hope they help you win an Oscar pool or two. Enjoy the show!
Best Picture
“The Artist”
“The Descendants”
“Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close”
“Hugo”
“Midnight In Paris”
“The Help”
“Moneyball”
“War Horse”
“The Tree of Life”
Best Actor
Demian Bichir, “A Better Life”
George Clooney, “The Descendants”
Jean Dujardin, “The Artist”
Gary Oldman, “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”
Brad Pitt, “Moneyball”
Best Actress
Glenn Close, “Albert Nobbs”
Viola Davis, “The Help”
Rooney Mara, “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”
Meryl Streep, “The Iron Lady”
Michelle Williams, “My Week With Marilyn”
Best Director
Woody Allen, “Midnight in Paris”
Michel Hazanavicius, “The Artist”
Terrence Malick, “The Tree of Life”
Alexander Payne, “The Descendants”
Martin Scorsese, “Hugo”
Best Supporting Actor
Kenneth Branagh, “My Week With Marilyn”
Jonah Hill, “Moneyball”
Nick Nolte, “Warrior”
Christopher Plummer, “Beginners”
Max Von Sydow, “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close”
Best Supporting Actress
Berenice Bejo, “The Artist”
Jessica Chastain, “The Help”
Melissa McCarthy, “Bridesmaids”
Janet McTeer, “Albert Nobbs”
Octavia Spencer, “The Help”
Best Original Screenplay
Woody Allen, “Midnight in Paris”
JC Chandor, “Margin Call”
Asghar Farhadi, “A Separation”
Michel Hazanavicius, “The Artist”
Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo, “Bridesmaids”
Best Adapted Screenplay
Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon, Jim Rash, “The Descendants”
John Logan, “Hugo”
George Clooney, Grant Heslov, “The Ides of March”
Aaron Sorkin, Steven Zaillian, “Moneyball”
Bridget O’Connor, Peter Straughn, “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”
Best Animated Feature
“A Cat In Paris”
“Chico & Rita”
“Kung Fu Panda 2”
“Puss in Boots”
“Rango”
Best Foreign Feature
“Bullhead” (Belgium)
“Footnote” (Israel)
“In Darkness” (Poland)
“Monsiuer Lazhar” (Canada)
“A Separation” (Iran)
Best Art Direction
“The Artist”
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”
“Hugo”
“Midnight in Paris”
“War Horse”
Best Cinematography
“The Artist”
“The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”
“Hugo”
“The Tree of Life”
“War Horse”
Best Costume Design
“Anonymous”
“The Artist”
“Hugo”
“Jane Eyre”
“W.E.”
Best Documentary Feature
“Hell and Back Again”
“If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front”
“Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory”
“Pina”
“Undefeated”
Best Documentary Short
“The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement”
“God Is the Bigger Elvis”
“Incident in New Baghdad”
“Saving Face”
“The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom”
Best Film Editing
“The Artist”
“The Descendants”
“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”
“Hugo”
“Moneyball”
Best Make-Up
“Albert Nobbs”
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”
“The Iron Lady”
Best Original Score
“The Adventures of Tintin”
“The Artist”
“Hugo”
“Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”
“War Horse”
Best Original Song
“Man or Muppet” from “The Muppets” Music and Lyric by Bret McKenzie
“Real in Rio” from “Rio” […]

Oscars: Chris Rock, Gary Oldman and “The Dark Knight Rises” in today’s Oscar news

By Sean O’Connell
hollywoodnews.com: With little more than a week to go before the Academy Awards on Sunday, Feb. 26, we truly have entered the final stretch, where frontrunners breathe a sigh of relief that the marathon’s almost over and analysts pick over every little crumb to see if there’s one more clue as to the direction Oscar voters might be heading with their ballots.
We have more than crumbs on the plate for today, though. We have news, and plenty of it. So, let’s dig into the latest items, the finest columns, and the last pieces of the Oscar puzzle as we continue to prepare for this month’s ceremony.
– One-time Oscar host Chris Rock has been added to the ever-growing list of presenters.
– Awards Daily looks at the relationship between the Best Picture and Original Screenplay winners, stating, “going back eleven years, only three times did the Best Picture winner not win screenplay. Usually, a screenplay win, and a director win for that matter, are tied to Best Picture. That means this year’s expected winner in screenplay is Michel Hazanavicius for The Artist.”
– Would you like to buy the glasses Best Actor nominee Gary Oldman wore in “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”? Because they are up for auction.
– Sherri Shepherd, Cameron Mathison, Jake Whetter and Shira Lazar have been tapped to host Oscars’ “Backstage Pass” for the Oscars’ website and digital app. It will provide viewers with a behind-the-curtain glimpse of ABC’s telecast and the Governers Ball soiree at the Kodak Theatre.
– Kris Tapley of InContention concludes his annual rundown of the Best Shots of 2011.
– And finally, looking ahead to next year’s Best Picture contenders. No!! It’s too soon!!
Awards Alley brings you the best Oscar coverage. Click below to read our exclusive interviews with:
– Harvey Weinstein
– The cast of “The Artist.”
– Kenneth Branagh for “My Week With Marilyn.”
– Bennett Miller talks “Moneyball.”
– Producer Jim Burke for “The Descendants.”
– Sir Ben Kingsley and Chloe Grace Moretz for “Hugo.”
– Tilda Swinton for “We Need to Talk About Kevin.”
– David Fincher, Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara on “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.”
– Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer for “The Help.”
– Tate Taylor for “The Help.”
– Woody Harrelson for “Rampart.”
– Gavin O’Connor for “Warrior.”
– Gary Oldman and Colin Firth for “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.”
– Charlize Theron, Patton Oswalt, Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody for “Young Adult.”
– Steve McQueen for […]

Oscars: “Tree of Life” cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki prevails with ASC – AWARDS ALLEY

By Sean O’Connell
hollywoodnews.com: Emmanuel Lubezki (“The Tree of Life”), Jonathan Freeman (“Boardwalk Empire”), Michael Weaver (“Californication”) and Martin Ruhe (PBS’ “Page Eight”) claimed top honors in the four competitive categories at the 26th Annual American Society of Cinematographers Outstanding Achievement Awards celebration, which was held in Los Angeles on Sunday night at the Hollywood & Highland Grand Ballroom.
The ASC Award for best feature was presented by award-winning actor Antonio Banderas who noted, “As I have found in my career on both sides of the camera, filmmaking at its core is about telling stories with images.”
Lubezki previously won the ASC Award in 2007 for his brilliant work on Alfonso Cuaron’s “Children of Men.” He also was nominated in 2000 for Tim Burton’s “Sleepy Hollow.”
He topped the other nominees in the feature film category, which were Guillaume Schiffman (“The Artist”), Jeff Cronenweth (“The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”), Robert Richardson (“Hugo”), and Hoyte van Hoytema (“Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”).
Later in the evening, Oscar-nominee Matthew Libatique presented the ASC Board of Governors Award to Harrison Ford in recognition of his tremendous body of work and contributions to the art of filmmaking.
Lubezki’s win Sunday night bodes well for his Oscar chances. Last year, Wally Pfister won the ASC feature film award for “Inception,” then went on to take home the Oscar as well. If Lubezki prevails on Feb. 26, he can say his journey began when he picked up the Hollywood Cinematographer Award, presented by Ben Affleck, at the Hollywood Film Awards gala … the official start of the Oscar season!

Awards Alley brings you the best Oscar coverage. Click below to read our exclusive interviews with:
– Harvey Weinstein
– The cast of “The Artist.”
– Kenneth Branagh for “My Week With Marilyn.”
– Bennett Miller talks “Moneyball.”
– Producer Jim Burke for “The Descendants.”
– Sir Ben Kingsley and Chloe Grace Moretz for “Hugo.”
– Tilda Swinton for “We Need to Talk About Kevin.”
– David Fincher, Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara on “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.”
– Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer for “The Help.”
– Tate Taylor for “The Help.”
– Woody Harrelson for “Rampart.”
– Gavin O’Connor for “Warrior.”
– Gary Oldman and Colin Firth for “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.”
– Charlize Theron, Patton Oswalt, Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody for “Young Adult.”
– Steve McQueen for “Shame.”
– Glenn Close for “Albert Nobbs.”
– Seth Rogen and Will Reiser for “50/50.”
– Producer Grant Heslov for “The Ides of March.”
For complete […]

Oscars: Could Glenn Close’s Irish win boost her Oscar profile? – AWARDS ALLEY

By Sean O’Connell
hollywoodnews.com: Best Actress nominee Glenn Close could be in for a big Oscar telecast IF there are a large number of Irish voters in the Academy.
The Irish certainly took to Close’s performance as a Dublin manservant in “Albert Nobbs,” rewarding the actress with the Irish Film And Television Academy’s best international actress award Saturday evening. THR reports that she topped fellow Oscar nominee Meryl Streep (“The Iron Lady”) as well as Tilda Swinton (“We Need To Talk About Kevin”) and Kirsten Wiig (“Bridesmaids”) for the top prize.
In addition to Close, the Irish recognized Ryan Gosling (“Drive”) for best international actor; Michael Fassbender (“Shame”) for leading actor; Chris O’Down (“Bridesmaids” for best supporting actor; Saoirse Ronan (“Hanna”) for lead performance in film; “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” for best international film; and “The Guard” for virtually every other prize, including Best Director (John Michael McDonagh), best screenwriter and the Irish Film Board Rising Star.
But given that Close is the one with Oscar dreams, lets’ focus on her for a minute as the Oscars fast approach.
Close first played the character of Albert Nobbs in an off-Broadway production in 1982. Ever since, she has been fighting to bring the sympathetically tragic character to the silver screen.
I caught up with the film at the Toronto International Film Festival and found it to be a wonderful story of self-discovery, of finding love and loving oneself. I want to repost a portion of a lengthy discussion I had with Close at TIFF, as well as the actress’s acceptance speech from the Hollywood Film Awards, where we honored Close with the Hollywood Career Achievement Award.
Close hasn’t won the Best Actress Oscar … yet. Could this be her year?
HollywoodNews.com: You first played Albert on stage decades ago. How had your thought process changed over the years in terms of approaching her as a character?
I think the essence of the character is probably them same. It’s me! I’ve aged 30 years. And that’s bound to make for a deeper impact. And also, on film, film is such a much more intimate medium than the stage. It was very difficult. There were some scenes where I didn’t know how much to show in my face. I was always going to Rodrigo, “Am I saying too much?” The first time she really looks somebody in the eye is after telling Hubert her story. That’s kind […]

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