December 04, 2016

Tag Archives: Toronto International Film Festival

Contenders from the Toronto Film Festival

Time is just flying on by, isn’t it folks? Over this past weekend, the Toronto International Film Festival (or TIFF) began to wrap up, giving out awards and setting up some potential contenders for the impending Oscar season. This came hot on the heels of the Venice Film Festival launching things like Arrival, Jackie, La La Land, and Nocturnal Animals into the race. Many of those then played at Toronto as well, further boosting their bonafides. With TIFF over and the New York Film Festival up next, I wanted to see what the big contenders are now, coming from up north. Knowledge is power, ladies and gentlemen, so let’s gain some today!
This year, TIFF managed to continue the buzz built at Venice for the aforementioned Arrival, Jackie, La La Land, and Nocturnal Animals, while putting out Lion and Moonlight into the world. Also of note was Loving, which is a veteran of the Cannes Film Festival, as well as a special presentation of some footage from Hidden Figures, which could turn out to be a player. Lion definitely got a big boost, as it was to that point only rumored as a push from The Weinstein Company. Moonlight probably got the best reviews overall, though La La Land continued its early dominance, especially when it took the Audience Award. As a reminder, TIFF gave that prize to the song and dance flick over Lion and the more fringe player Queen of Katwe. Keep that in mind, as it’s just the first of many huzzahs.

Looking at those specific eight titles, you see some definite potential with the Academy. If I had to guess, La La Land will fare better than any of the other big contenders so far. There doesn’t appear to be anything immediately in danger of being shut out, but it’s early. La La Land is the closest we have to a sure thing, due to its content and nature. The award was just another feather in its cap. One or two of these might suffer if an NYFF player like Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk supplants as a thing, but that remains to be seen. Right now, TIFF is still fresh in our minds.

As a quick reminder before we wrap up, here again are the awards that were given out at TIFF:
*Audience Award: La La Land (First Runner Up: Lion / Second Runner Up: Queen of Katwe)*
Dropbox Discovery […]

“La La Land” takes the Audience Award at the Toronto Film Festival

Yesterday, the Toronto International Film Festival gave out its awards for 2016, with Damien Chazelle’s La La Land taking the top prize. That distinction, the People’s Choice prize, also known as the Audience Award, puts it into some very strong company (for those wondering, the first runner up was Lion, while the second runner up was Queen Of Katwe). The original musical, which stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, has been winning over viewers for a few weeks now, starting out at the Venice Film Festival, continuing at the Telluride Film Festival, and now charming everyone at Toronto. At this point, it was already considered the frontrunner in Best Picture, but now, one can say it with more distinction. Frankly, it’s hard not to consider this the one to beat right now.
In terms of this particular award and its history, this is a somewhat reliable indicator of prestige. La La Land now joins a group that has five prior Best Picture winners, along with a whole host of nominees since the prize was introduced in the late 1970’s. Just look here at the list of what has won since the Audience Award was originally instituted:
1978 – Girlfriends
1979 – Best Boy
1980 – Bad Timing
1981 – Chariots of Fire
1982 – Tempest
1983 – The Big Chill
1984 – Places in the Heart
1985 – The Official Story
1986 – The Decline of the American Empire
1987 – The Princess Bride
1988 – Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
1989 – Roger & Me
1990 – Cyrano de Bergerac
1991 – The Fisher King
1992 – Strictly Ballroom
1993 – The Snapper
1994 – Priest
1995 – Antonia
1996 – Shine
1997 – The Hanging Garden
1998 – Life Is Beautiful
1999 – American Beauty
2000 – Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
2001 – Amélie
2002 – Whale Rider
2003 – Zatōichi
2004 – Hotel Rwanda
2005 – Tsotsi
2006 – Bella
2007 – Eastern Promises
2008 – Slumdog Millionaire
2009 – Precious
2010 – The King’s Speech
2011 – Where Do We Go Now?
2012 – Silver Linings Playbook
2013 – 12 Years a Slave
2014 – The Imitation Game
2015 – Room
2016 – La La Land

As you can see, getting the People’s Choice prize is a pretty big deal. Now, we don’t know if La La Land is going to follow in the footsteps of Chariots of Fire, American Beauty, Slumdog Millionaire, The King’s Speech, and 12 Years a Slave, going the distance to an Oscar win in Best Picture, but the odds are certainly not bad. The Academy Award is a ways […]

Hollywood Contenders: The fall film festival season is shaping up to be a very exciting one

As we wind down towards the end of the summer, one can’t help but have their minds wander towards what’s next, cinematically speaking. Namely, the fall festival season, which will soon be upon us. We’ve already had the Venice Film Festival announce their lineup, as well as most of the titles playing at the Toronto International Film Festival, but earlier today the New York Film Festival also announced what was playing at their shindig. Now, we mostly know the lay of the festival landscape, and it’s looking very exciting, if I do say so myself. The next few months can’t come soon enough…
Below you will see what the Toronto International Film Festival, Venice Film Festival, and New York Film Festival have announced to date as their entries. Each fest has something interesting and exclusive to offer, while there is some crossover to be found as well. Personally, I’ll be attending NYFF, so New York’s lineup is of a bit more interest to me than Toronto or Venice, though the latter has a great set of movies playing, while the former is certainly going to give us some contenders (TIFF always does). Now, let’s get down to brass tacks and show you what will be playing where. Here we go!
Toronto
This is what has been announced for TIFF so far:
GALAS:
Arrival, Denis Villeneuve, USA
Deepwater Horizon, Peter Berg, USA – World Premiere
The Edge of Seventeen, Kelly Fremon Craig, USA – World Premiere – CLOSING NIGHT FILM
The Headhunter’s Calling, Mark Williams, Canada – World Premiere
The Journey is the Destination, Bronwen Hughes, United Kingdom/South Africa – World Premiere
JT + The Tennessee Kids, Jonathan Demme, USA – World Premiere
LBJ. Rob Reiner, USA – World Premiere
Lion, Garth Davis, Australia – World Premiere
Loving, Jeff Nichols, USA – North American Premiere
The Magnificent Seven, Antoine Fuqua, USA – World Premiere
A Monster Calls, J.A. Bayona, USA/Spain – World Premiere
Planetarium, Rebecca Zlotowski, France/Belgium – North American Premiere
Queen of Katwe, Mira Nair, South Africa/Uganda – World Premiere
The Rolling Stones Olé Olé Olé! : A Trip Across Latin America, Paul Dugdale, United Kingdom – World Premiere
The Secret Scripture, Jim Sheridan, Ireland – World Premiere
Snowden, Oliver Stone, Germany/USA – World Premiere
Strange Weather, Katherine Dieckmann, USA – World Premiere
SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS
The Age of Shadows (Miljeong), Kim Jee woon, South Korea – North American Premiere
All I See Is You, Marc Forster, Thailand – World Premiere
American Honey, Andrea Arnold, USA – North American Premiere
American Pastoral, Ewan McGregor, USA – World […]

“Room” wins the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto Film Festival

During the afternoon yesterday, the Toronto International Film Festival gave out its prestigious Audience Award, often considered a harbinger for the Academy Awards. The winner at TIFF this year? Well, in a bit of an upset, it was none other than Room, the Lenny Abrahamson directed film that stars Brie Larson in a role that’s generated some major Oscar buzz. The inside word had big time award player Spotlight as the odds on favorite for the prize, but Room is what wound up taking it. As such, this is now a contender worth paying even more attention to than we were already. It’s a player, no doubt about it…
For those who aren’t aware of this one, Room is an adaptation of the beloved novel by Emma Donoghue, who also penned the screenplay. It centers on a mother named Ma (played by Larson) and her young son Jack (Jacob Tremblay) who are trapped in a confined space for a half decade. Ma knows of the outside world, obviously, but this room is all that Jack knows, so when an escape from captivity is achieved, it’s not all sunshine and roses. Their one room prison was home, a terrifying transition must now be made. The aforementioned Abrahamson directs Donoghue’s script, with the cast aside from Larson and Tremblay including Joan Allen, William H. Macy, and more. It was always going to be an indie awards contender, but now that it has this prize, it’s an Oscar hopeful in a big way for sure.
Speaking of this award, here’s the complete history of the People’s Choice Award at TIFF:
1978 – Girlfriends
1979 – Best Boy
1980 – Bad Timing
1981 – Chariots of Fire
1982 – Tempest
1983 – The Big Chill
1984 – Places in the Heart
1985 – The Official Story (La historia oficial)
1986 – The Decline of the American Empire (Le déclin de l’empire américain)
1987 – The Princess Bride
1988 – Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios)
1989 – Roger & Me
1990 – Cyrano de Bergerac
1991 – The Fisher King
1992 – Strictly Ballroom
1993 – The Snapper
1994 – Priest
1995 – Antonia
1996 – Shine
1997 – The Hanging Garden
1998 – Life Is Beautiful (La vita è bella)
1999 – American Beauty
2000 – Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Wo Ho Cang Long)
2001 – Amélie (Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain)
2002 – Whale Rider
2003 – Zatōichi
2004 – Hotel Rwanda
2005 – Tsotsi
2006 – Bella
2007 – Eastern Promises
2008 – Slumdog […]

“The Martian” launches itself as an awards hopeful at the Toronto Film Festival

For months, I’d been predicting The Martian to win a bunch of Oscars in my early looks at the race. Honestly, how I felt the nominations would go didn’t necessarily reflect that, but rather what I thought the ideal performance of this interesting title could be. Well, I wound up moving it down a bit in my predictions in advance of its premiere at the Toronto Film Festival, which proved to be an odd choice, as the early word was rather terrific for the flick. It definitely seems to be a contender, though winning seems unlikely now. At the same time, comparisons to something like Apollo 13 really do make you stand up and take notice. Could this go where something like the vastly underrated Interstellar could not last year? Let’s take a look…
Once again, a quick primer on The Martian. The story is pretty straightforward, at least at the start…what if an astronaut was accidentally stranded on Mars? For Mark Watney (Damon), that worst case scenario comes true when his crew (led by Jessica Chastain) thinks he’s been killed while on the Red Planet and takes off for Earth. Still alive, but injured and only with supplies for a short period of time, Mark has to use his science skills as a botanist to figure out how to survive for literally years until something can be figured out. Back home, NASA goes from assuming he’s been lost to wondering what can be done for him, and his crew-mates formulate plans of their own. Ridley Scott directs, while Drew Goddard penned the adaptation of Andy Weir’s novel. In addition to Damon in the lead role and Chastain in one of the main supporting ones, the star studded cast includes Sean Bean, Jeff Daniels, Mackenzie Davis, Chiwetel Ejifor, Donald Glover, Kate Mara, Michael Pena, Sebastian Stan, and Kristen Wiig. The cinematography is by Dariusz Wolski while the underrated Harry Gregson-Williams handles the score. The ingredients are all there, and apparently the mixture is up to snuff.
The thing that came out of Toronto for this flick most was how successful it will be with audiences. Every single year, we get one Best Picture nominee that’s closer to a blockbuster than an art house hit, so could this be the one? There’s certainly a chance, as I’d say in excess of 90% of the early reviews were positive to very positive. Some […]

The Toronto Film Festival has crowded the Oscar field in a big way

If there’s one thing you can count on from the Toronto International Film Festival each and every single year, it’s that the fest is going to launch a ton of major Academy Award contenders. This year, that was no exception, as the race really has begun to take its initial shape in the wake of certain Toronto debuts. Much like with the recent Telluride Film Festival and Venice Film Festival, as well as the upcoming New York Film Festival, each major movie premiere changes the race a bit. It’s still early, but with the exception of the two major mysteries still to be revealed at NYFF in Gone Girl/Inherent Vice and titles that won’t really be making festival bows like Fury, Interstellar, Into the Woods, and Unbroken, we know who the players are. It’s just which flicks will be able to sustain buzz and begin winning precursor awards.
With Toronto still going strong, I wanted to look at how some of the players there turned out and how those titles are shaping the race in new ways. Among the many titles playing and/or having premieres of some sort at TIFF, we have Black and White from Mike Binder, The Cobbler from Thomas McCarthy, The Drop from Michaël R. Roskam, The Equalizer from Antoine Fuqua, The Good Lie from Philippe Falardeau, The Humbling from Barry Levinson, The Judge from David Dobkin, Love & Mercy from Bill Pohlad, Men Women & Children from Jason Reitman, Miss Julie from Liv Ullmann, Nightcrawler from Dan Gilroy, Pawn Sacrifice from Ed Zwick, St. Vincent from Theodore Melfi, The Theory of Everything from James Marsh, This Is Where I Leave You from Shawn Levy, Top Five from Chris Rock, Tusk from Kevin Smith, and While We’re Young from Noah Baumbach. Throw in Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher making a stop up North as well as previously established contenders like Damien Chazelle’s Whiplash, Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner, Jon Stewart’s Rosewater, Morten Tyldum’s The Imitation Game, and Jean-Marc Vallee’s Wild all continuing their solid buzz building and you have just about everything that’s in contention so far.
First up, let’s knock out the films we don’t really have to worry about in the awards season anymore due to mixed/poor reviews. It seems like Black and White, The Cobbler, The Good Lie, The Humbling, The Judge, Miss Julie, and This Is Where I Leave You are pretty much buried, unless Robert Duvall gets […]

The Toronto Film Festival will again play host to scores of Oscar hopefuls

With today’s announcement that David Dobkin’s film The Judge will open the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival, I figured that it was a good time to talk about the TIFF lineup. That Robert Downey Jr. vehicle will seek to become an awards player, and it’s not alone. Each year, scores of titles descend on Toronto in order to distinguish themselves to Academy members and various precursor voters everywhere. The festival has a solid history of producing Oscar nominees, though the big time competition this year from the New York Film Festival will certainly shine a light on just how essential a stop this fest still is. For now though, it’s a big one, and well worth a bit of discussion.
As mentioned above, the opening film is The Judge, which could be a Best Actor player for Downey Jr. or perhaps even a Best Picture contender if it’s better than expected. It’s definitely one of the most anticipated flicks starting up their run at the festival, along with the closing selection, which is Alan Rickman’s A Little Chaos. Along with those two, the highest profile titles include Jon Stewart’s Rosewater, Jean-Marc Vallée’s Wild, Jason Reitman’s Men, Women, & Children, Liv Ullmann’s Miss Julie, Dan Gilroy’s Nightcrawler, and James Marsh’s The Theory of Everything. Each of these is considered a major awards hopeful to one degree or another, so it’ll be their first test of viability. Strong reactions set it off on a path to potential Oscar glory, while mixed to poor reactions could sent it straight down the drain into oblivion.
Other big debuts at the fest will be Noah Baumbach’s While We’re Young, Mike Binder’s Black and White, Antoine Fuqua’s remake of The Equalizer, Ed Zwick’s Pawn Sacrifice, Lone Scherfig’s The Riot Club, Shawn Levy’s This Is Where I Leave You, Ramin Bahrani’s 99 Homes, Chris Evans’ directorial debut Before We Go, Bill Pohlad’s Love & Mercy, Barry Levinson’s The Humbling, David Gordon Green’s Manglehorn, as well as other works like The Drop and The Imitation Game, all of whom have some level of awards hope to them. Most won’t take on that kind of narrative, but at least one or two will, so it becomes almost a game trying to figure out which ones it will be ahead of time.
The other titles of note are Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher of course, along with David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars, Mike Leigh’s […]

“Silver Linings Playbook” kicking off this year’s Savannah Film Festival – OSCARS

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: David O. Russell’s Oscar contender “The Silver Linings Playbook” will open The 2012 Savannah Film Festival, an annual event that this year will showcase similar awards contenders like Robert Zemeckis’ “Flight,” Dustin Hoffman’s “Quartet,” the crowd-pleasing musical comedy “The Sapphires” and Michael Haneke’s emotionally draining “Amour.”
The fest will kick off on Saturday, Oct. 27. It also will conclude with a 3D screening of DreamWorks Animation’s holiday blockbuster “Rise of the Guardians.”
Russell’s comedy has been building awards momentum since it took home the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. The Hollywood Film Awards announced so far that it will recognize Robert De Niro with the “Hollywood Supporting Actor” award, as well as Russell with this year’s “Hollywood Director Award.” Expect them to be the first of many prestigious award nominations “Silver Linings” picks up as the season rolls along.
Savannah steadily has been raising its profile as a stop on the lengthy awards marathon, following the Venice-Telluride-Toronto trifecta and the New York and L.A. (AFI) fests. The festival has U.S. premiered two Pedro Almodovar films, as well as films by Robert Redford and Woody Allen. Special gala screenings, which were shown before their national release, include “127 Hours,” “Amelie,” “Babel,” “Black Swan,” “Precious,” “Sideways,” “Slumdog Millionaire,” “The Artist,” “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly,” “The Wrestler” and “Up in the Air.” This year, Savannah’s lineup makes room for the aforementioned films, all of which hold Oscar aspirations and can benefit from packed-house screenings in the Georgia city.
In addition, Savannah organizers have revealed that they will celebrate the fest’s 15th anniversary by recognizing Academy Award-nominated actors Matt Dillon (“Crash”) and Diane Lane (“Unfaithful”) with Outstanding Achievement in Cinema Awards. Michelle Monaghan (“Gone Baby Gone”) also will receive a “Spotlight Award” for her performance in “Tomorrow You’re Gone,” while Academy Award-winning writer and director Geoffrey Fletcher (“Precious”) will receive the “SCAD Cinevation Award,” which is given to one director for imagination, inspiration and innovation in cinema.
I’ll be reporting from the Savannah Film Festival once again this year, participating in panels and drinking in the cinema with the Southeast’s most sophisticated film-fest audiences. It has become a must-attend event every year, both for the festival’s professionalism, the impressive lineup, and the city’s overwhelming hospitality.
Tickets for the 2012 Savannah Film Festival are on sale, and can be purchased online at savannahboxoffice.com, or […]

“Silver Linings Playbook” wins People’s Choice Award in Toronto – OSCARS

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: In our recent wrap up of this year’s rich, rewarding Toronto International Film Festival slate, I wrote that the surprise of TIFF was David O. Russell’s “The Silver Linings Playbook” … not because it’s good (which it is), but because “Playbook” absolutely crushed it with Toronto crowds and seemed to collect the most Oscar “buzz” of all the films heading North to kick-start their awards campaigns.
Looks like the “Silver Lining” surprises just keep coming.
Toronto organizers announced that Russell’s comedy won the People’s Choice Award Sunday afternoon. The victory builds on the strong audience reaction out of TIFF that Russell has hit a home run with his adaptation of Matthew Quick’s darkly cynical novel. Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro and Russell all earned raves from TIFF crowds. Now the fest has put its money where its mouth is, and “Playbook” leaves TIFF with some valuable hardware that can only help its Oscar campaign.
With no tangible way to measure, I’d say “Playbook” was the most buzzed about film following a Saturday evening screening in Toronto. Based on the success of Russell’s “The Fighter,” you can expect to hear a lot more about “Silver Linings” as the awards season rolls on.
The Weinstein Company looks to have “Silver Linings Playbook” in theaters on Nov. 21. It’s possible the studio could move that release date forward by a few days, but for now, that’s how long you’ll have to wait to see Russell’s latest winner.
Read more of our exclusive Toronto coverage:
Our “Silver Linings Playbook” review!
Ben Affleck’s “Argo” scores
Rian Johnson’s “Looper” reviewed
“Amour” amazes, “Rust & Bone” ultimately delivers
TIFF: The Day Before the Madness
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Toronto ’12 Wrap Up: Which movies helped their Oscar chances? Is Silver Linings Playbook the film to beat? – AWARDS ANALYSIS

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywoodnews.com: My approach to the Toronto International Film Festival was slightly different from years past. Instead of pausing between screenings to comment on films as they played, I sprinted from one movie to the next, collecting impressions like a kid gathering colorful Easter eggs on a Sunday morning hunt.
Oscars: Is Silver Linings Playbook the film to beat?
As a result, I was able to cram 20 movies and a handful of engaging interview opportunities into my five-day Toronto stay. I left TIFF this year with a clearer picture of the ongoing Oscar race (but also acknowledge that there are still so many films left to debut … some of which we’ll see at the New York Film Festival later this month).
So, which movie helped their Oscar causes by screening in Toronto? Let’s run through the top titles, and see what kind of buzz they were able to generate.

“The Silver Linings Playbook”
When The Weinstein Company opted to skip Telluride, Toronto became a very important “first step” for David O. Russell’s dark comedy. And by all accounts, “Playbook” hit a home run. With no tangible way to measure, I’d say this was the most buzzed about film following a Saturday evening screening. Key Oscar bloggers sang the praises of Russell’s cast, with Jennifer Lawrence suddenly viewed as the frontrunner in the Best Actress category on certain Oscar-tracking Web sites. Based on the success of Russell’s “The Fighter,” you can expect to hear a lot more about “Silver Linings” as the awards season rolls on.
“The Master”
Another film likely to generate multiple Oscars nominations, Paul Thomas Anderson’s “The Master” screened in glorious 70mm at the TIFF Bell Lightbox theater to critical acclaim ahead of its Sept. 14 release. The loudest praise swirled around the film’s lead performances – with Joaqin Phoenix slightly edging out Philip Seymour Hoffman in the “Wow” factor, and Amy Adams also generating raves for her supporting turn. Did the film do enough to compete for a Best Picture slot? It will be interesting to see how “The Master” is received by ticket buyers once it enters the marketplace.

“Argo”
Ben Affleck’s third directorial effort, on the other hand, seemed to solidify its chances at a valuable Best Picture nomination with a very strong showing in Toronto (followed by its celebrated bow in Telluride). If there’s a single complaint about “Argo,” it’s that the ensemble is so powerf, […]

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