July 10, 2015

Tag Archives: toy story 3

Ranking every Pixar film so far

I’m hardly the only one to think of this, but with Pixar putting their new film Inside Out into theatrical release today, what better time is there to rank all of their works to date? I’ve obviously seen all 15 films, from Toy Story and A Bug’s Life all the way to this week’s Inside Out. Again, with a list/ranking, my take is not the definitive one, so just keep that in mind. Especially with Pixar, everyone has a different favorite. I do hope you enjoy my version though, and remember not to miss Inside Out, which is a real special flick of theirs…
Here now is how I’d rank every Pixar movie so far:
15. Cars – Not a bad film, per say, but a strangely un Pixar-like outing. By and large, this follows the same beats as Doc Hollywood, which I much prefer. Here, it’s the voice of Owen Wilson subbed in for Michael J. Fox, which is a downgrade. Oddly enough, the highlight is Larry the Cable Guy. It’s nothing to boo and hiss at, but it’s perhaps their most disposable movie.
14. Brave – Rarely does Pixar play it safe, but it felt like they did here. Their take on a Princess movie doesn’t have the brain of their best work, even if it’s among their most visually stunning. Aside from the look of it, you really have a hard time remembering any of the plot details. It’s not as smart as they usually make their movies, so again…it’s not something you avoid, but it’s clearly part of their lower end of the Pixar spectrum.
13. Cars 2 – Notable to me mainly for just how odd it is, the sequel was an improvement on the first one, but not an undisputed success either. A spy movie this time out, it’s closer to a Bond flick than anything else, which sounds insane, I know. As such, it only sometimes works, but the bold direction does help distinguish it a bit among the bottom tier of their movies.
12. A Bug’s Life – This early Pixar entry has a lot of the ingredients that would go into their classics, but at this point, the meal was still a bit raw. I don’t really have many complaints about this one, though part of my lack of cheerleading for it has to do with my preference for the edgier Antz, which came out around […]

The 83rd Academy Awards: If I had been a voter

After a brief delay, this series has returned. Yes, once again I’m going to be taking a look back at a recent Oscar lineup and explaining what my vote would have been in each of the big eight categories we all follow so intently each season. I previously mentioned that potentially I could do this once a week with previous Academy Award ceremonies, and while I’m going to be truing to do that, time will still tell. Again, if nothing else, this gives you an interesting look into my cinematic tastes. Over the course of the year you can sort of get a feel for what my current favorites are, but now we can look to the past a bit more.
Alright then, here goes nothing folks…behold my picks:
Best Picture – The Social Network
The nominees here for this ceremony were 127 Hours, Black Swan, The Fighter, Inception, The Kids Are All Right, The King’s Speech, The Social Network, Toy Story 3, True Grit, and Winter’s Bone. My personal pick Blue Valentine wasn’t nominated, of course, so my number two pick is an easy one…The Social Network. Such a shame that it fell short here to The King’s Speech in real life.
Best Director – David Fincher for The Social Network
This category featured Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan), Joel and Ethan Coen (True Grit), David Fincher (The Social Network), Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech), and David O. Russell (The Fighter), and yet the three most interesting choices in Aronofsky, Fincher, and Russell were passed over for Hooper. I’d change that though, and go with Fincher. Had I been given the power to vote for anyone though, I’d probably have gone with Derek Cianfrance for Blue Valentine.
Best Actor – Jesse Eisenberg for The Social Network
I didn’t intend to vote down the line for The Social Network, but so far it just has worked out that way. My personal pick Ryan Gosling for Blue Valentine got snubbed, so I had to go to my second choice. The nominees here were Javier Bardem (Biutiful), Jeff Bridges (True Grit), Jesse Eisenberg (The Social Network), James Franco (127 Hours), and Colin Firth (The King’s Speech). It’s hard to argue with Firth’s win, but I think Eisenberg was slightly more deserving overall.
Best Actress – Michelle Williams for Blue Valentine
Honestly, I might prefer Natalie Portman for Black Swan, but I can’t resist the chance to give Blue Valentine an Oscar win […]

Why the Academy shouldn’t go back to five Best Picture nominees

One of the most fiercely debated subjects when it comes to the Oscars, aside from the actual films and performances in contention, is what the Academy should do with the size of their Best Picture slates. Recently, rumors have been swirling that AMPAS members have been considering again adjusting the potential lineup, perhaps even going back to having five nominees in Picture. I know there are plenty of fans out there who back that idea, while there are plenty more who want Oscar to go back to a straight ten. I certainly know which one I prefer, but I don’t agree that either idea beats the sliding scale that we currently have. Personally, I feel that going back to five would be a big mistake. In fact, I want them to do the exact opposite.
Why do I say that? Well, I truly believe that a bigger group of Best Picture nominees leads to better selections. There’s a ripple effect that I’ll discuss in the next paragraph, but when more films are in contention, it creates a better group overall. Especially when there was a guaranteed ten, you knew that voters were looking at their favorite movies of the year and keeping their minds open about what they traditionally thought a Best Picture nominee should be. That got us District 9 in a lineup, for example. I also reject the notion that it led to poor choices. If The Blind Side and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close are the worst nominees in an expanded field, we’re still doing pretty well. They’re weaker nominees, but far from bad ones. The Academy has plenty of history with ten nominees, if not quite as much as it does with five. It’s just the sliding scale that’s new and not well liked. If Oscar goes back to five, it runs the risk of diluting the overall field, in a way I’m not sure they’re even considering.
For example, the biggest issue with going back to five is how much it would impact the smaller contenders. Look at just this past year and consider the case of Whiplash. If there were only five spots, I doubt it gets a big campaign coming out of Sundance like it did, leading to perhaps only J.K. Simmons getting in, if that. No nomination for Best Picture. It definitely doesn’t overcome category confusion to show up in Best Adapted Screenplay. The […]

“Toy Story 3″: The Top 25 (Best Animated Feature)

Onward we go folks with this weekly series of mine that I’m doing here at the site. Yes, we’re talking the top 25 Oscar winners in just about every single one of the Academy Award categories out there to be discussed. As you know, aside from the shorts and something like Best Sound Editing or Best Sound Mixing like I already mentioned previously, I’ll be hitting them all over the coming weeks and months. Of course, that includes the big eight categories, a few of which I’ve already knocked off. I’m also potentially going to do one that doesn’t exist (a fictitious Best Ensemble category), but that’s just an idea I currently am toying with. We’ll see about that one.
Today I’ll be tackling a category I teased you all about last week, with this one being the…Best Animated Feature field. As you all certainly know by this point, depending on the category in question, I may wind up discussing the individual winners I’m citing pretty specifically or just giving more of a broad overview of the winners. For now though, I’m still keeping it fairly simple and saving the more expansive installments for the biggest of the categories. Like I’ve said over the past month or so though, in all honesty, you all mostly just want to see the lists anyway, so I have no problem obliging you there in that particular regard. All you have to do is just be patient over the next couple of paragraphs once again. Also of note here, there won’t be 25 winners listed, since the category isn’t 25 years old yet (and in actuality is still just a teenager). In short, I’ll be ranking the entire history of the category.
This time around, I’m going to be taking the overview route again, since as mentioned above, it’s an abbreviated list. Still, there are a number of different types of animation on display below, from anime to hand drawn to computer animated, so it’s another week where the list contains something for everyone. As such, it’s again a matter of taste, at least to some degree. Are you a Pixar fan? A back of Hiyao Miyazaki? Either way, there’s a cartoon for you here.
I’ll basically just discuss my top ten a bit now, even if that’s a good portion of the entire category’s history. To me, the best winner of this category so far to […]

“Monsters University” and “Pacific Rim” take Hollywood Film Awards Honors

The 17th Annual Hollywood Film Awards announced today that Disney/Pixar’s “Monsters University,” directed by Dan Scanlon and produced by Kori Rae, will be the recipient of the Hollywood Animation Award, and Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures “Pacific Rim” visual effects supervisor John Knoll will receive the “Hollywood Visual Effects Award” at the Hollywood Film Awards Gala Ceremony.
The announcement was made today by Carlos de Abreu, founder and executive producer of the Hollywood Film Awards. He said: “John Knoll’s groundbreaking work on Pacific Rim sets a new standard in visual effects. The robots and monsters in the film truly come to life through the best visual effects of the year. Once again, the animation and storytelling of “Monsters University” reflects Pixar’s creativity and greatness.”

The award will be bestowed at the Hollywood Film Awards Gala Ceremony on Monday evening, October 21, 2013 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills.
The Hollywood Film Awards honors cherished stars, filmmakers and up-and-coming talent, and traditionally kicks off the film awards season with the biggest stars and top industry executives in attendance.
“We are very proud to be the first stop of the awards season. In the last ten years, a total of 96 Oscar® nominations and 34 Oscars® were given to the honorees of the Hollywood Film Awards,” said de Abreu.
Last year’s awards show received more than 41 million media impressions, in addition to more than 300 million online and print readers’ impressions.
About Dan Scalon
Dan Scanlon made his animated feature directorial debut with Disney/Pixar’s 14th feature film, “Monsters University,” which has grossed over $700 million dollars worldwide since its June 2013 release. He also co-wrote the film’s story and screenplay. As a youngster in Clawson, Michigan, Scanlon possessed a love for Warner Bros. cartoons, animated Disney films and, as fate would have it, Pixar short films. His passion inspired him to study film and animation in high school and in college where he focused on illustration at Columbus College of Art and Design (CCAD). Upon graduating from CCAD, Scanlon began working as an animator and story artist for Character Builders, a 2D animation company that produced feature and commercial work in Columbus, Ohio. Scanlon joined Pixar Animation Studios in September 2001 as a storyboard artist on Disney/Pixar’s award-winning features “Cars” and “Toy Story 3.” During the initial production stages for both films, he worked to translate the director’s story ideas into […]

The Dark Knight Rises topped the weekend box office again with $36 million.

HollywoodNews.com:In the face of two relatively non-mighty openers, The Dark Knight Rises (review/spoiler-review) topped the weekend box office again with $36 million. As has been the case throughout the film’s much-debated run (which is really only 17 days old), it’s doing pretty spectacular by any logical standard but must be defended from those who think it automatically should have topped The Dark Knight and/or challenged The Avengers.
The film has $354 million after three weekends, versus The Dark Knight ($393 million) and The Avengers ($457 million). It’s the third-biggest 17-day total of all-time, closely surpassing Avatar ($352 million) as the third-fastest film to reach $350 million. It will crack $400 million in two or three weekends (surely the fourth-fastest movie to do so if it can in less than Shrek 2’s 43 days) and anything after that is merely bragging rights. It may or may not crack $1 billion worldwide, with around $700 million so far and holding up relatively well. Despite my concerns following its Harry Potter/Twilight-esque opening weekend, it’s already having a leggier run than any recent Harry Potter or Twilight Saga sequel, as well as Spider-Man 3 (2.2x its weekend) or Iron Man 2 (2.4x times its weekend). It’ll out gross Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith ($380 million) and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II ($381 million) around next weekend.
It will probably outgross Transformers 2 ($402 million), Spider-Man ($403 million), and The Hunger Games ($405 million) by the end of the month, with Toy Story 3 ($415 million), The Lion King ($422 million), and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest ($423 million) waiting on tap if it can keep those non-IMAX screens during the end-of-August deluge. So relax Bat-fans, it’s doing just fine.
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“Brave” Hits Bullseye With $66.7 Million

HollywoodNews.com: Another year, another $60-$70 million Pixar opening weekend. Brave (review) is their thirteenth release, as well as their thirteenth number-one debut and their eighth film to open between $60 and $70 million since 2001. Brave, which attracted headlines due to the fact that it was Pixar’s first film with a female lead (and a female director until Brenda Chapman was replaced by Mark Andrews), opened with an estimated $66.7 million this weekend, putting it (for now) just above Cars 2’s $66.1 million debut and a bit below Up’s $68.1 million opening as the fifth-best debut in Pixar history.
Brave pulled in $24.5 million on Friday, which gives the film a 2.71x weekend multiplier, which is actually pretty low by Pixar standards. Still, it’s close enough to the 2.73x multiplier for Wall-E ($23m/$63m), the 2.68x weekend multiplier for Toy Story 3 ($41m/$110m), and the 2.64x weekend multiplier for Cars 2 ($25m/$66m) to avoid any alarm. Movies, even most animated ones, are just a bit more front-loaded these days and Pixar films tend to play like sequels in a popular franchise than stand-alone entries. In terms of total box office, there is always the chance that Brave could play like Cars 2, which (comparatively) flamed out with just 2.8x weekend-to-total multiplier ($191 million domestic) and end up below $200 million.
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Weekend Box Office: The Lion King 3D

HollywoodNews.com: In a slightly shocking result that has several notable meanings, Disney’s 3D-converted re-release of The Lion King (essay) cruised into the number one spot over the weekend with a mighty $30.1 million. Acting as both a two-week advertisement for the October 4th Blu Ray release and a test run for possibly reviving the old ‘out of the vault and back into theaters’ strategy of old, the film didn’t just top the box office but very nearly set a record for the Mouse House.
In the realm of Disney cartoons that are NOT Pixar releases, The Lion King 3D is actually fifth on the opening weekend list, behind Tarzan ($34 million), Chicken Little ($40 million), The Lion King ($40.8 million), and Tangled ($48 million). It is the fifth-biggest September opening in history and came within $600,000 of besting the $30.7 million domestic gross of Disney’s Toy Story/Toy Story 2 double-feature 3D re-release October, 2009. That re-release, which was both an advertisement for the Toy Story/Toy Story 2 Blu Ray releases as well as the upcoming Toy Story 3, opened with $12.4 million despite Disney offering two shows for the price of one (IE – half the show times in a given day). So simply taking the Toy Story 3D opening weekend and doubling it gives you around $25 million, meaning that this weekend’s result was not quite as unexpected as its being reported.
If The Lion King 3D matches the 2.4x weekend-to-total multiplier of the Toy Story double-feature, then we’re looking at $71 million. That accomplishes three goals. First of all, it’s already surpassed the $339 million domestic gross of Finding Nemo, which means that The Lion King is now the biggest-grossing non-sequel cartoon of all-time. Second of all, a $73 million total will be JUST enough to get The Lion King over the $400 million mark, which just looks prettier. And finally, with $12 million in overseas added to the new domestic total of $357 million, the worldwide gross for The Lion King now sits at $825 million (Up yours, Shrek the Third!).
If this re-release does $73 million in America and $32 million overseas (a reasonable guess), then ends with $890 million and leapfrogs over Finding Nemo ($867 million) and most importantly Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs ($886 million). The $919 million worldwide total of Shrek […]

Starz Unwraps “Toy Story” Gift in Unprecedented Television Marathon

HollywoodNews.com: It’s three times the Pixar magic of Buzz Lightyear, Woody for the first time ever, Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and the Starz Saturday Night Premiere of Toy Story 3. This is the first time that all three films will be shown together on television, an incredible evening for the entire family.
It will take place on Saturday, April 16th, beginning at 6:05 p.m. (ET/PT). Marathon continues Sunday, April 17 at 9:00 a.m. and at 5:15 p.m.
The Toy Story Story
The franchise began in 1995 with Tom Hanks and Tim Allen lending their voices as cowboy Woody and astronaut Buzz Lightyear. The first film won a Special Achievement Oscar® for director John Lasseter, culminating in 2010 with a Best Animated Feature statuette for Toy Story 3 director Lee Unkrich and Best Song for composer Randy Newman. Throughout the storied franchise, Toy Story has garnered 10 Academy Award® nominations and the three films have grossed over $1 Billion at the boxoffice.
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Oscars: “The King’s Speech,” Colin Firth and Tom Hooper are Crowned

By Sean O’Connell
HollywoodNews.com: The 83rd Annual Academy Awards.
“The King’s Speech,” Colin Firth and Tom Hooper are crowned.
Congratulations to all involved!!
11:31 p.m. ET – (Almost) right on time, it’s Spielberg to announce Best Picture! #oscars
11:25 p.m. ET – Colin Firth wins! #oscars
11:21 p.m. ET – Sandra Bullock just called Jeff Bridges “dude” … and made it sound adorable. #oscars
11:20 p.m. ET – Here comes Best Actor! #oscars
11:16 p.m. ET – And it goes to Natalie Portman! #oscars
11:11 p.m. ET – The Dude abides … and presents Best Actress. #oscars
11:02 p.m. ET – Best Director goes to Tom Hooper!! #oscars
11:01 p.m. ET – And now, the meat of the ceremony! #oscars
10:59 p.m. ET – Of course. I’ve already forgotten David Seidler’s tender speech. Thanks @Danitalicious, for reminding me.
10:52 p.m. ET – Has “The King’s Speech” won anything yet? By my count, it’s oh-fer. Right? #oscars
10:46 p.m. ET – After the live performances, Original Song goes to Randy Newman for “We Belong Together,” from “Toy Story 3.” #oscars
10:37 p.m. ET – Great Tweet from InContention’s Kris Tapley, who writes, “How cruel to keep building the hopes for the Socialites.” He’s probably right, but I’m beginning to believe Social Network has a pretty good shot at Picture. We’ll know soon enough. #oscars
10:35 p.m. ET – Man, #Inception is cleaning up in the technical categories … #oscars
10:27 p.m. ET – Is Billy Crystal taking over? There might be a God. #oscars
10:21 p.m. ET – Yawn. Inside Job. Solid flick, but … the financial meltdown? Okay. I guess. #oscars
10:20 p.m. ET – BANKSY. BANKSY. BANKSY. Please? #oscars
10:19 p.m. ET – Wait, Oprah’s big Oscar thing isn’t supposed to be until tomorrow! #oscars
10:18 p.m. ET – Auto tune the Oscars? Pretty funny. #oscars
10:15 p.m. ET – Live Action Short goes to God of Love! #oscars
10:13 p.m. ET – Documentary Short Film winner is Strangers No More! #oscars
10:11 p.m. ET – By my count, we’ve got 10 Oscars left to hand out.
10:02 p.m. ET – Here come the songs! Randy Newman doing “We Belong Together.” Slow start but sounding good now.
9:59 p.m. ET – Costume Design goes to “Alice In Wonderland” … its second #oscars win tonight.
9:57 p.m. ET – Kudos to the Academy for remembering February’s “The Wolfman” for makeup. #oscars
9:55 p.m. ET – “Congratulations, nerds?” Oh, Franco. Unfunny and mean-spirited are not a good combination at the #oscars
9:54 p.m. ET – […]

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