April 22, 2014

Tag Archives: USD

Johnny Depp’s ‘Transcendence’ Bombs

Rentrak Corporation, the leader in precisely measuring movies and TV everywhere, today announced the worldwide weekend box office estimates for the weekend of April 20, 2014 as compiled by the company’s Box Office Essentials™ and International Box Office Essentials™ theatrical measurement services.
As the trusted standard for all studio box office reporting, Rentrak provides intelligence into overnight theatre-level reporting across the global theatrical market. Coupled with the official reported data, studios are able to analyze admissions and gross results in over 50 territories using Rentrak’s suite of products.
Rentrak’s Senior Media Analyst Paul Dergarabedian commented, “The international box office goes to the birds as Fox’s animated sequel ‘Rio 2′ leads the international box office adding $48 million to its nest this weekend as it nears $300 million worldwide. Disney/Marvel’s ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ passed the $500 million mark globally heading into the weekend and is now at an impressive $586.6 million. Sony kicks off its international run of ‘The Amazing Spider-Man 2′ in 14 territories and captures an amazing $47 million ahead of its North American debut set for the first weekend in May.”
The top-12 domestic weekend box office estimates listed in descending order, per data collected as of Sunday, April 20, 2014, are below.
1. Captain America: The Winter Soldier – Disney – $26.6M
2. Rio 2 – 20th Century Fox – $22.5M
3. Heaven Is For Real – Sony – $21.5M
4. Transcendence – Warner Bros. – $11.2M
5. Haunted House 2, A – Open Road – $9.1M
6. Draft Day – Lionsgate – $5.9M
7. Divergent – Lionsgate – $5.8M
8. Oculus – Relativity Media – $5.2M
9. Noah – Paramount – $5.0M
10. God’s Not Dead – Freestyle Releasing – $4.8M
11. Bears – Disney – $4.8M
12. Grand Budapest Hotel, The – Fox Searchlight – $3.4M

Critics’ Choice: Joey Berlin from BFCA

Joey Berlin from the Broadcast Film Critics Association – Critics’ Choice Awards
By ROBERT W. WELKOS
In 1995, Joey Berlin and Rod Lurie, two entertainment reporters and film critics who had written for rival publications, joined forces to create the Broadcast Film Critics Assn.
While Lurie would go on to carve out a successful Hollywood career as a screenwriter and director with such films as “The Contender” and “The Last Castle,” Berlin hasn’t faired too badly, either, as the president of the BFCA.
Starting with 44 members the first year, the BFCA’s voting membership today hovers between 285 and 290 and the organization bills itself as the largest film critics group in the U.S. and Canada.
At the same time, the BFCA created the Critics’ Choice Awards, a glitzy tux-and-gown gala now televised on the CW Network that features red carpet celebrity arrivals, drawing worldwide media attention and plenty of Oscar buzz since the show coincides with the run-up to the Academy Awards.
But as the show has catapulted the broadcast critics into the Oscar conversation each movies awards season, tax records show that the nonprofit group Berlin leads has paid his privately-owned company, Berlin Entertainment, Inc., hundreds of thousands of dollars each year for production services.
Read prior Broadcast Film Critics Association story here at Hollywoodnews.com
IRS Form 990 filings list Berlin Entertainment, Inc., receiving a combined $992,270 from the nonprofit between fiscal 2009 and 2011.
Berlin notes that his members seem to be satisfied with the job he’s doing since he has been repeatedly re-elected president every two years.
The tax files show that Berlin’s base compensation and benefits were a combined $1,297,133 for the three-year period spanning fiscal 2009 to 2011. But his compensation is listed as coming from “related organizations” and not directly from the BFCA, according to the Form 990 documents, which all nonprofits are required to file with the IRS to qualify for tax-exempt status.
When asked about his sizeable compensation, Berlin told HollywoodNews.com in a recent telephone interview: “I did this for five years for zero compensation, but this is what I do all day, every day. I’m really proud of what we’ve built and accomplished….
“My compensation has grown with the growth of the show,” he adds without apology. “The television show is an incredible benefit to the members.” He notes that these benefits include such things as access and awards screeners. “That seems a comfortable arrangement for everybody.”
One [...]

“Captain America: The Winter Soldier” – Worldwide weekend box office estimates

Rentrak Corporation (NASDAQ: RENT), today announced the worldwide weekend box office estimates for the weekend of April 13, 2014 as compiled by the company’s Box Office Essentials™ and International Box Office Essentials™ theatrical measurement services.
As the trusted standard for all studio box office reporting, Rentrak provides intelligence into overnight theatre-level reporting across the global theatrical market. Coupled with the official reported data, studios are able to analyze admissions and gross results in over 50 territories using Rentrak’s suite of products.
Rentrak’s Senior Media Analyst Paul Dergarabedian commented, “Fox’s animated “Rio 2″ flaps its wings to an international chart topping performance of $62.3 million in 62 territories while Disney/Marvel’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” makes its two worldwide weekends in a row at over $100 million and nearly half a billion to date as it continues to draw audiences internationally and in North America. Impressively, Paramount’s biblical-epic “Noah” is approaching the $250 million global threshold.”
The top-12 domestic weekend box office estimates listed in descending order, per data collected as of Sunday, April 13, 2014, are below.
Estimated Box Office Numbers for Weekend of Apr. 13:
1. Captain America: The Winter Soldier – Disney – $41.4M
2. Rio 2 – 20th Century Fox – $39.0M
3. Oculus – Relativity Media – $12.0M
4. Draft Day – Lionsgate – $9.8M
5. Divergent – Lionsgate – $7.5M
6. Noah – Paramount – $7.5M
7. God’s Not Dead – Freestyle Releasing – $5.5M
8. Grand Budapest Hotel, The – Fox Searchlight – $4.0M
9. Muppets Most Wanted – Disney – $2.2M
10. Mr. Peabody And Sherman – 20th Century Fox – $1.8M
11. Raid 2, The – Sony Pictures Classics – $1.0M
12. Non-Stop – Universal – $0.7M.
RENTO
Contacts:
Paul Dergarabedian
Senior Media Analyst
(818) 917-9697
pauld@rentrak.com

‘Captain America’ commands the top spot at the Box Office this weekend

Happy Sunday everyone. Here I am once again with the weekly box office report. Leading the way this weekend in a huge way was Marvel’s latest, Captain America: The Winter Soldier which debuted with a fantastic $96.2 million at the box office. Far behind at number two we had the second week of Noah, which had quite the drop and only pulled in an estimated $17 million more into its pockets. Number three happened to be Divergent, which had a better hold and took in another $13 million from audience members. No other new release besides the Marvel sequel cracked the top ten. Among the independent/limited releases, we had a really strong debut for Under the Skin, while Dom Hemingway, Franke & Alice, and The Unknown Known did decently enough. Jinn however, pretty much flopped. Only three movies in the top ten managed eight figure weekends, so most of the audiences were just seeing a certain superhero and his latest adventure…
Building off of some incredible buzz and top notch reviews, Captain America: The Winter Soldier managed to come close to breaking the $100 million mark opening weekend. I found the movie to be one of the better superhero flicks of late, so going forward this one could be a smash hit. On the flip side, I don’t know how well any of the platform releases will do. Jinn clearly was a B horror movie looking to make a quick buck, and that just didn’t happen. I was impressed by Under the Skin’s very solid per theater average though, so perhaps that one will manage to be an unlikely crossover success.
Among the notable holdovers in theaters, the aforementioned Noah saw much of its audience erode, while both God’s Not Dead and The Grand Budapest Hotel continue to perform above expectations. Sabotage continued to flop, on the other side of the coin, not even managing to make $2 million this weekend. We also had Mr. Peabody & Sherman crack the $100 million mark, so congrats there. Overall, it was just a very summer-ish weekend, if that makes sense. Essentially, everyone just went to see Captain America…
Here now is what the top ten looked like at the box office for this weekend:
1. Captain America: The Winter Soldier – $96,200,000
2. Noah – $17,000,000
3. Divergent – $13,000,000
4. God’s Not Dead – $7,726,000
5. The Grand Budapest Hotel – $6,300,000
6. Muppets Most Wanted – $6,285,000
7. Mr. Peabody [...]

‘Noah’ floods the Box Office this weekend

Happy Sunday once more to you all. Here I am again with the weekly box office report I know you crave so deeply. Leading the way this weekend and leaving the competitors all wet (sorry, I couldn’t resist) was Darren Aronofsky’s take on Noah, which debuted with a pretty solid $44 million at the box office. At number two we had the second week of Divergent, which pulled in $26.5 million more. Number three was Muppets Most Wanted, which had a decent hold and took in another $11.3 million from you fine audience members. The only other new release in the top ten besides Noah was the Arnold Schwarzenegger flick Sabotage, which basically flopped with only $5.3 million. Among the independent/limited releases, we had a mediocre debut for the biopic Cesar Chavez, while The Raid 2 was one film that actually opened well in a platform release. Overall, the movies that are doing well are veering more towards the blockbusters again, so you know that spring and summer must be on their way…
Despite some controversy and less than universal praise for the film, Noah managed to be by far the biggest opening of Darren Aronofsky’s career. Personally, I found the movie pretty interesting, and I’m perhaps the least religious person out there, so that says something about the filmmaker’s talent for telling a unique story. Going forward, a lot will depend on if audiences come back for seconds, but regardless, the opening will probably help Aronofsky with whatever he decides to make next. On the flip side, I’m not sure who’s going to want to have Schwarzenegger in their flick anymore, as Sabotage basically bombed, despite being the new film from the director of the well regarded End of Watch. Much like the middling debut for Cesar Chavez, audiences just didn’t seem to be interested at all.
Among the notable holdovers in theaters, we once again have to begin by discussing Wes Anderson’s latest film. The Grand Budapest Hotel expanded to just under 1000 theaters and moved up again, this time to number six this week, taking in $8.8 million. It’s likely going to become the biggest success of Anderson’s career. Also worth mentioning besides the ones mentioned above, 300: Rise of an Empire managed to break the $100 million mark with a $4.3 million weekend, while Mr. Peabody & Sherman is next in line for that mark as they added [...]

Film Festival: Palm Springs Gold

25th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala – Awards Presentation. Meryl Streep and Margo Martindale
By ROBERT W. WELKOS
It’s no mirage.
After a quarter-century, and some early struggles, the Palm Springs International Film Festival has seen its visibility and star quotient rise significantly by tapping into Hollywood’s hotly contested movie awards season.
The festival’s success—it now draws about 130,000 attendees—has come without a lucrative television deal for its black-tie gala similar to ones enjoyed by the Golden Globes and the Critics’ Choice Awards.
The festival was the brainchild of the late Palm Springs Mayor Sonny Bono, who rose to stardom as half of the pop singing duo Sonny and Cher and later became a U.S. congressman representing the Coachella Valley. Bono died in a 1998 skiing accident.
Harold Matzner, a local businessman and philanthropist who was a close friend and tennis partner of Bono’s, eventually took over the financially struggling festival and improved its bottom line.
A patron of the arts, Matzner not only chairs the film festival but also chairs the McCallum Theatre, is vice president on the board of trustees at the Palm Springs Art Museum, and his other philanthropic efforts include Desert AIDS Project, Stroke Recovery Center, Temple Isaiah and Animal Samaritans. He owns Spencer’s restaurant in Palm Springs.
Matzner has credited the late Hollywood publicist Ronni Chasen for helping him get Hollywood studios to send movie stars being mentioned for the Oscars to be honored at the Palm Springs festival’s black-tie gala. Chasen was murdered in 2010 in a drive-by shooting in Beverly Hills as she drove her black Mercedes-Benz and police concluded it was a random attack carried out by a transient riding a bike.
Matzner chairs the tax-exempt organization behind the festival—the Palm Springs International Film Society.
The film society’s Form 990 tax returns that are filed annually with the IRS show that the nonprofit has achieved success as the film festival has become more popular.
The tax filings show that:
*The film festival had more than $26 million in total support from fiscal years 2005-06 to 2012-13.
*Revenues totaled $3.9million and expenses totaled $3.3 million in fiscal 2012-13.
*No grants were listed from fiscal 2009-10 to 2012-13.
*Chairman Matzner and other board members received no compensation for their work on the festival.
*The nonprofit paid Spencer’s restaurant $117,525 for catering and use of its facilities in fiscal 2012-13 and $113,912 in fiscal 2011-12.
*The nonprofit paid Wessman Development Co. $89,896 and $90,638 for the same [...]

No one at the box office this weekend seemed to be a ‘Nymphomaniac’

Happy Sunday once again everyone, here I am with the weekly box office report for you fine folks out there. Leading the way in a pretty significant landslide this weekend was the presumed franchise starter Divergent, which debuted with a very strong $50 million at the box office. At number two we had the relatively weak debut of the family sequel Muppets Most Wanted, which could only pull in $16.5 million. Number three was last week’s number one Mr. Peabody & Sherman, which took in another $11.7 million from you all. The other new release in the top ten was the religious film God is Dead, which came out of nowhere to amass an $8.5 million cume. Among the independent/limited releases, we had okay debuts for the comedy Cheap Thrills and the documentary Jordorowsky’s Dune, while the anticipated theatrical release of Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac Part One was rather underwhelming. Apparently audiences wanted to watch that particular film at home on VOD as opposed to in a theater with strangers. Make of that what you will…
I’m fairly surprised that Muppets Most Wanted and Nymphomaniac Part One didn’t do better, while Divergent did about what I expected and God is Dead came out of nowhere (it wasn’t screened for critics, so I wasn’t invited to a screening and I don’t make a habit of seeking out these sort of flicks). Among the titles that opened well, the former basically assures that the next two books in the series will be coming to theaters near you, while the latter potentially could lead to a bigger opening for Noah next week, though folks looking for a similar experience there will be in for a surprise. In regard to the two that underwhelmed, the former ran into some resistance due to a few other kid-centric titles being out as well, so it wasn’t a must see movie. As for the latter, it was never going to be a crossover success, but I’m sure it had hopes of being an art house smash, and that clearly isn’t the case. Maybe Part Two will somehow do better in a few weeks?
Among the notable holdovers in theaters, we again have to discuss Wes Anderson’s movie for sure. The Grand Budapest Hotel expanded to about 300 theaters and moved up to number seven this week with $6.7 million. That’s some strong continued success there. Also worth mentioning besides [...]

Shanghai’s $2.4 billion “DreamCenter” to Open in 2017

In a sign of Hollywood’s expanding ties with China, DreamWorks Animation and Chinese partners Thursday unveiled their $2.4 billion “DreamCenter,” an entertainment complex in Shanghai that is set to open in 2017.
The complex will contain a 500-seat IMAX cinema with international film festivals and red carpet events in mind, bars, restaurants and performance venues, according to the companies.
A “Dream Avenue” theater district modeled on London’s West End and New York City’s Broadway will also be part of the complex, according to the Associated Press.
The 40-acre site includes eight outdoor events plazas.
The project is led by “Kung Fu Panda” and “Shrek” maker DreamWorks Animation, Chinese investment fund CMC Capital Partners, whose owners include state-owned companies, and Hong Kong developer Lan Kwai Fong, according to the AP.
“This will become the world’s third great urban center of entertainment and arts alongside New York’s Broadway and London’s West End,” DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg told a news conference, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Flight of Big-budget Films Costs 50,000 Jobs

The loss of big-budget movies like “The Hobbit” to New Zealand and “Iron Man 3” and “Oz, The Great and Powerful” to North Carolina and Michigan, is costing California nearly 50,000 jobs and $410 million in state and local tax revenues, according to a study released Thursday by the Southern California Association of Governments.
“Even the loss of only half of that spending cost the state a significant amount of economic activity,” the report states. “It is evident that (California) is losing ground to other states and nations.”
Among the findings: California continued to see its market share erode. The study found that 75 percent of the 41 live action feature films with production budgets in excess of $75 million were filmed outside of California in fiscal 2013.
The loss of “Iron Man 3” and “The Hobbit,” Parts 1 and 2, had a combined budget of $320 million, the study notes.
As it was, California’s Film and Television Tax Credit Program returned an impressive 11 percent return on investment in its first three years and helped generate $4.3 billion in economic activity and supported 22,300 jobs, according to the study.
Among the findings:
*Under the first three years of funding, 109 film projects were funded and completed.
*Those projects generated $247.7 million in state and local tax revenues, $4.3 billion in economic output and $1.6 billion in labor income.
*For every $1 of tax credit certificate issued, total economic activity in the state increased by $19.12, total state gross domestic product increased by $9.48, and $1.11 was returned to state and local governments in the form of tax revenues.
“You cannot look at this program and not see it is a formidable economic and fiscal benefit,” said Hasan Ikhrata, SCAG executive director. “California is very much at risk of losing its film industry, and without this program the past five years, the losses would have been even more painful.”
The report was commissioned by SCAG, the nation’s largest metropolitan planning organization, and principally authored by Christine Cooper, vice president, economic and policy analysis, for the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.

Audiences are flocking to ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’ at the Box Office

Happy Sunday everyone (my birthday weekend, if you haven’t heard too), here’s the weekly box office report for you fine ladies and gentlemen! Leading the way in a somewhat close race on this kind of quiet weekend was the holdover Mr. Peabody & Sherman, which rose from number two to number one with an estimated $12.2 million, taking advantage of a lack of particularly enticing new releases at the multiplex. At number two we had last week’s top grosser 300: Rise of an Empire, which hauled in an estimated $19.1 million this time around. Number three was the new release Need for Speed, which stole $17.8 million from paying customers, while Tyler Perry’s The Single Moms Club was number five with $8.3 million, and we also had one other new release in the top ten, which was Veronica Mars, transitioning from Kickstarter to theaters with about $2 million. I’ll have something to say about the great expansion for The Grand Budapest Hotel in a moment, but among the limited release openings, there was a nice mix. The best of the bunch was Bad Words, but also taking in a few bucks we had indies like Enemy and Le Week-End, though neither were hits.
I didn’t care one bit for Need for Speed, as it’s lacking even for video game adaptations, but it was notable that it didn’t do better. You’d think that with the popularity of the Fast and Furious franchise that this would have been like printing money, but no. It also likely won’t have legs either, which could make this a bit of a failure in the end. This weekend also saw audiences begin to send a message to Tyler Perry that he needs to try a little harder, as Tyler Perry’s The Single Moms Club made a fraction of what Perry’s movies usually do. Finally, Veronica Mars was aimed just at hardcore fans and that’s who showed up, so I can’t really say it did anything other than what was expected.
Among the notable holdovers in theaters, we have to discuss Wes Anderson’s flick. The Grand Budapest Hotel. Still playing in well under 100 theaters, it cracked the top ten, hitting number eight with $3.6 million. The big number though is the per theater average of over $55,000. Any which way that you slice it, Anderson has another hit on his hands, so we’ll be talking plenty more about [...]

Page 1 of 18312345...102030...Last »